Diagnostic utility of the subjective peripheral neuropathy screen in HIV-infected persons with peripheral sensory polyneuropathy

Anita B. Venkataramana, Richard L. Skolasky, Jason A. Creighton, Justin C. McArthur

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

A retrospective analysis of the Johns Hopkins University HIV neurology database was performed to assess the sensitivity and specificity of the Subjective Peripheral Neuropathy Screen (SPNS) for detecting HIV-associated sensory neuropathies. The SPNS, a 3-item scale that evaluates lower extremity neuropathic symptoms, was administered to 75 patients from the HIV neurology outpatient clinic. Patients graded the severity of each symptom on a scale of 1 to 10, and the sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic efficiency of the SPNS were calculated for each symptom. The results showed that the SPNS had a sensitivity of 47%, a specificity of 83%, a positive predictive value of 70%, and a diagnostic efficacy of 67%. The SPNS appears to be a useful screening tool for HIV-associated sensory neuropathies; it has a high specificity and a good positive predictive value.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)341-344+348-349+354
JournalAIDS Reader
Volume15
Issue number7
StatePublished - Jul 1 2005

Keywords

  • Clinical trials
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Peripheral neuropathy
  • Sensory neuropathies
  • Subjective peripheral neuropathy screen

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Infectious Diseases

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