Diagnostic Inefficiency of Nonselective Spinal Angiography (Flush Aortography) in the Evaluation of the Normal and Pathological Spinal Vasculature

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Abstract

Selective spinal angiography was introduced in the 1960s to palliate the poor sensitivity of nonselective techniques for the evaluation of the spinal cord vasculature. Recent advances made in the field of angiography seem to have prompted a renewed interest for nonselective spinal angiography, or flush aortograms. This pictorial essay, illustrated with 2 cases of presurgical evaluation of the spinal cord supply and 2 cases of spinal vascular malformation, suggests that nonselective techniques remain insufficient to properly document the normal or pathological spinal vasculature. While flush aortography can play a role as a complement to spinal angiography, for example, to locate vessels eluding selective catheterization, relying on nonselective studies to rule out the presence of a spinal vascular malformation or to identify the normal spinal cord supply before surgical interventions may lead to false-negative investigations with potentially devastating consequences.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalCurrent Problems in Diagnostic Radiology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2015

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Aortography
Angiography
Spinal Cord
Vascular Malformations
Catheterization

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

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title = "Diagnostic Inefficiency of Nonselective Spinal Angiography (Flush Aortography) in the Evaluation of the Normal and Pathological Spinal Vasculature",
abstract = "Selective spinal angiography was introduced in the 1960s to palliate the poor sensitivity of nonselective techniques for the evaluation of the spinal cord vasculature. Recent advances made in the field of angiography seem to have prompted a renewed interest for nonselective spinal angiography, or flush aortograms. This pictorial essay, illustrated with 2 cases of presurgical evaluation of the spinal cord supply and 2 cases of spinal vascular malformation, suggests that nonselective techniques remain insufficient to properly document the normal or pathological spinal vasculature. While flush aortography can play a role as a complement to spinal angiography, for example, to locate vessels eluding selective catheterization, relying on nonselective studies to rule out the presence of a spinal vascular malformation or to identify the normal spinal cord supply before surgical interventions may lead to false-negative investigations with potentially devastating consequences.",
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