Diagnostic and measurement issues in the assessment of pediatric bipolar disorder: Implications for understanding mood disorder across the life cycle

Eric Youngstrom, Oren Meyers, Jennifer Kogos Youngstrom, Joseph R. Calabrese, Robert L. Findling

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

The goal of this paper is to review assessment research of bipolar disorder in children and adolescents. The review addresses numerous themes: the benefits and costs of involving clinical judgment in the diagnostic process, particularly with regard to diagnosis and mood severity ratings; the validity of parent, teacher, and youth self-report of manic symptoms; how much cross-situational consistency is typically shown in mood and behavior; the extent to which a parent's mental health status influences their report of child behavior; how different measures compare in terms of detecting bipolar disorder, the challenges in comparing the performance of measures across research groups, and the leading candidates for research or clinical use; evidence-based strategies for interpreting measures as diagnostic aids; how test performance changes when a test is used in a new setting and what implications this has for research samples as well as clinical practice; the role of family history of mood disorder within an assessment framework; and the implications of assessment research for the understanding of phenomenology of bipolar disorder from a developmental framework.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)989-1021
Number of pages33
JournalDevelopment and psychopathology
Volume18
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2006
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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