Diagnosis of probable cocaine-induced cerebral vasculitis by magnetic resonance angiography

Jeremy D. Gradon, Robert Wityk

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Cocaine-induced cerebral vasculitis is a serious but uncommon clinical entity. We present a case of probable cocaine-induced cerebral vasculitis that was unusual in that it was suggested by magnetic resonance angiography. The patient was a 42-year-old woman, who used cocaine both intravenously and intranasally, who was admitted with the acute onset of an illness that resembled bacterial meningitis. Results of the initial standard evaluation were negative, and a diagnosis of cerebral vasculitis was ultimately suggested by magnetic resonance angiography. We believe this to be the first reported case of the diagnosis of cocaine-induced cerebral vasculitis to be suggested by magnetic resonance angiography.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1264-1266
Number of pages3
JournalSouthern Medical Journal
Volume88
Issue number12
Publication statusPublished - 1995

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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