Diabetic retinopathy screening and the use of telemedicine

Ingrid E Zimmer Galler, Alan E. Kimura, Sunil Gupta

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose of review Evidence-based practice guidelines and treatments are highly effective in reducing vision loss from diabetic retinopathy. However, less than half of the total number of patients with diabetes mellitus receive recommended annual retinal evaluations, and vision loss due to diabetic retinopathy remains the leading cause of blindness in adults. Poor adherence to screening recommendations stems from a number of challenges which telemedicine technology may address to increase the evaluation rates and ultimately reduce vision loss. The aim of this review was to provide an update on the recent advances in tele-ophthalmology and how it may expand our current concept of eye care delivery for diabetic eye disease. Recent findings The benefits of telemedicine diabetic retinopathy are proven for large population-based systems. Outcomes information from community-based programs is now also beginning to emerge. Improved screening rates and less vision loss from diabetic retinopathy are being reported after implementation of telemedicine programs. New imaging platforms for telemedicine programs may enhance the ability to detect and grade diabetic retinopathy. However, financial factors remain a barrier to widespread implementation. Summary Telemedicine diabetic retinopathy screening programs may have a significant impact on reducing the vision complications and healthcare burden from the growing diabetes epidemic.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)167-172
Number of pages6
JournalCurrent Opinion in Ophthalmology
Volume26
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 9 2015

Fingerprint

Telemedicine
Diabetic Retinopathy
Aptitude
Eye Diseases
Evidence-Based Practice
Ophthalmology
Blindness
Practice Guidelines
Diabetes Mellitus
Technology
Delivery of Health Care
Population

Keywords

  • diabetic retinopathy screening
  • healthcare delivery
  • tele-ophthalmology
  • telemedicine
  • teleretinal screening

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Diabetic retinopathy screening and the use of telemedicine. / Zimmer Galler, Ingrid E; Kimura, Alan E.; Gupta, Sunil.

In: Current Opinion in Ophthalmology, Vol. 26, No. 3, 09.05.2015, p. 167-172.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Zimmer Galler, Ingrid E ; Kimura, Alan E. ; Gupta, Sunil. / Diabetic retinopathy screening and the use of telemedicine. In: Current Opinion in Ophthalmology. 2015 ; Vol. 26, No. 3. pp. 167-172.
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