Diabetes problem-solving scale development in an adult, African American sample.

Felicia Hill-Briggs, Hsin Chieh Yeh, Tiffany L. Gary, Marian Batts-Turner, Thomas D'Zurilla, Frederick L. Brancati

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

PURPOSE: The purpose of this pilot study was to examine psychometric properties of the Diabetes Problem-Solving Scale (DPSS), which was designed to assess how adults with type 2 diabetes approach and manage problems encountered in diabetes self-management. METHODS: Participants were 64 African American adults with type 2 diabetes. The 30-item DPSS and measures of social problem solving, diabetes self-management, and depressive symptoms were administered. Blood samples were collected to measure hemoglobin A1C level. RESULTS: Cronbach alpha for the DPSS total scale was .77 and ranged from .72 to .78 for subscales. Correlations of the DPSS total score and subscale scores with a standardized social problem-solving scale ranged from 0.30 to 0.46 (all P <.01). Higher DPSS total scores, indicating better self-reported diabetes problem solving, were associated with higher medication adherence, more frequent self-monitoring of blood glucose, and lower hemoglobin A1C level. Of the DPSS subscales, Impulsive Style, Negative Transfer of Past Experience/Learning, and Negative Motivation were differentially associated with reduced self-management and disease control. CONCLUSION: The DPSS demonstrated acceptable total scale and subscale internal consistency, construct validity, and predictive validity in this pilot sample. The scale may have utility both in identifying associations between diabetes-related problem solving and self-management and in guiding problem solving interventions to improve self-management and control.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)291-299
Number of pages9
JournalDiabetes Educator
Volume33
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2007

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

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