Diabetes, fasting glucose, and the risk of glaucoma: A meta-analysis

Di Zhao, Juhee Cho, Myung Hun Kim, David S Friedman, Eliseo Guallar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Topic: We performed a systematic review to summarize the association of diabetes and blood glucose levels with glaucoma, intraocular pressure (IOP), and ocular hypertension in the general population. Clinical Relevance: Diabetes has been proposed as a risk factor for glaucoma, but epidemiologic studies have been inconsistent, and the association is still controversial. Furthermore, no systematic reviews evaluated other metabolic abnormalities, such as the metabolic syndrome, with the risk of glaucoma. Methods: We identified the studies by searching the PubMed and EMBASE databases. We used inversevariance weighted random-effects models to summarize relative risks across studies. Results: We identified 47 studies including 2 981 342 individuals from 16 countries. The quality of evidence generally was higher in the cohort compared with case-control or cross-sectional studies. The pooled relative risk for glaucoma comparing patients with diabetes with those without diabetes was 1.48 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.29-1.71), with significant heterogeneity across studies (I2 = 82.3%; P <0.001). The risk of glaucoma increased by 5% (95% CI, 1%-9%) for each year since diabetes diagnosis. The pooled average difference in IOP comparing patients with diabetes with those without diabetes was 0.18 mmHg (95% CI, 0.09-0.27; I2 = 73.2%), whereas the pooled average increase in IOP associated with an increase in 10 mg/dl in fasting glucose was 0.09 mmHg (95% CI, 0.05-0.12; I2 = 34.8%). Conclusions: Diabetes, diabetes duration, and fasting glucose levels were associated with a significantly increased risk of glaucoma, and diabetes and fasting glucose levels were associated with slightly higher IOP.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)72-78
Number of pages7
JournalOphthalmology
Volume122
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

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Glaucoma
Meta-Analysis
Fasting
Intraocular Pressure
Glucose
Confidence Intervals
Ocular Hypertension
PubMed
Blood Glucose
Epidemiologic Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Databases
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology
  • Medicine(all)

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Diabetes, fasting glucose, and the risk of glaucoma : A meta-analysis. / Zhao, Di; Cho, Juhee; Kim, Myung Hun; Friedman, David S; Guallar, Eliseo.

In: Ophthalmology, Vol. 122, No. 1, 01.01.2015, p. 72-78.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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