Diabetes and bone loss at the hip in older black and white adults

Ann V. Schwartz, Deborah E. Sellmeyer, Elsa S. Strotmeyer, Frances A. Tylavsky, Kenneth R. Feingold, Helaine E. Resnick, Ronald I. Shorr, Michael C. Nevitt, Dennis M. Black, Jane A. Cauley, Steven R. Cummings, Tamara B. Harris

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Type 2 diabetes may be associated with elevated fracture risk, but the impact on bone loss is unknown. Analysis of 4-year change in hip BMD data from a cohort of white and black well-functioning men and women 70-79 years of age found that white women with diabetes had more rapid bone loss at the femoral neck than those with normal glucose metabolism. Introduction: Type 2 diabetes may be associated with elevated fracture risk in older adults. Although type 2 diabetes is not associated with lower BMD, older diabetic adults have a higher prevalence of other risk factors for fracture, including more frequent falls, functional limitations, and diabetic complications. With this burden of risk factors, loss of BMD could place older adults with diabetes at higher risk of sustaining a fracture. Materials and Methods: To determine if bone loss is increased with type 2 diabetes, we analyzed data from the Health, Aging, and Body Composition Study of white and black well-functioning men and women 70-79 years of age. Hip BMD was measured at baseline and 4 years later in 480 (23%) participants with diabetes, 439 with impaired glucose metabolism, and 1172 with normal glucose homeostasis (NG). Results: Those with diabetes had higher baseline hip BMD and weight, but among white women, had more weight loss over 4 years. White women with diabetes lost more femoral neck and total hip BMD than those with NG in age-adjusted models. After multivariable adjustment, diabetes was associated with greater loss of femoral neck BMD (-0.32%/year; 95% CI: -0.61, -0.02) but not total hip BMD. In men and black women, change in hip BMD was similar for participants with diabetes and NG. Conclusions: Despite having higher baseline BMD, diabetic white women, but not men or black women, had more rapid bone loss at the femoral neck than those with NG. This increased bone loss may contribute to the higher fracture risk observed in older diabetic women.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)596-603
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Bone and Mineral Research
Volume20
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2005
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Hip
Bone and Bones
Femur Neck
Glucose
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Homeostasis
hydroquinone
Diabetes Complications
Body Composition
Weight Loss
Weights and Measures
Health

Keywords

  • BMD
  • Diabetes mellitus
  • Female
  • Longitudinal studies
  • Male
  • Race

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Schwartz, A. V., Sellmeyer, D. E., Strotmeyer, E. S., Tylavsky, F. A., Feingold, K. R., Resnick, H. E., ... Harris, T. B. (2005). Diabetes and bone loss at the hip in older black and white adults. Journal of Bone and Mineral Research, 20(4), 596-603. https://doi.org/10.1359/JBMR.041219

Diabetes and bone loss at the hip in older black and white adults. / Schwartz, Ann V.; Sellmeyer, Deborah E.; Strotmeyer, Elsa S.; Tylavsky, Frances A.; Feingold, Kenneth R.; Resnick, Helaine E.; Shorr, Ronald I.; Nevitt, Michael C.; Black, Dennis M.; Cauley, Jane A.; Cummings, Steven R.; Harris, Tamara B.

In: Journal of Bone and Mineral Research, Vol. 20, No. 4, 04.2005, p. 596-603.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Schwartz, AV, Sellmeyer, DE, Strotmeyer, ES, Tylavsky, FA, Feingold, KR, Resnick, HE, Shorr, RI, Nevitt, MC, Black, DM, Cauley, JA, Cummings, SR & Harris, TB 2005, 'Diabetes and bone loss at the hip in older black and white adults', Journal of Bone and Mineral Research, vol. 20, no. 4, pp. 596-603. https://doi.org/10.1359/JBMR.041219
Schwartz AV, Sellmeyer DE, Strotmeyer ES, Tylavsky FA, Feingold KR, Resnick HE et al. Diabetes and bone loss at the hip in older black and white adults. Journal of Bone and Mineral Research. 2005 Apr;20(4):596-603. https://doi.org/10.1359/JBMR.041219
Schwartz, Ann V. ; Sellmeyer, Deborah E. ; Strotmeyer, Elsa S. ; Tylavsky, Frances A. ; Feingold, Kenneth R. ; Resnick, Helaine E. ; Shorr, Ronald I. ; Nevitt, Michael C. ; Black, Dennis M. ; Cauley, Jane A. ; Cummings, Steven R. ; Harris, Tamara B. / Diabetes and bone loss at the hip in older black and white adults. In: Journal of Bone and Mineral Research. 2005 ; Vol. 20, No. 4. pp. 596-603.
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abstract = "Type 2 diabetes may be associated with elevated fracture risk, but the impact on bone loss is unknown. Analysis of 4-year change in hip BMD data from a cohort of white and black well-functioning men and women 70-79 years of age found that white women with diabetes had more rapid bone loss at the femoral neck than those with normal glucose metabolism. Introduction: Type 2 diabetes may be associated with elevated fracture risk in older adults. Although type 2 diabetes is not associated with lower BMD, older diabetic adults have a higher prevalence of other risk factors for fracture, including more frequent falls, functional limitations, and diabetic complications. With this burden of risk factors, loss of BMD could place older adults with diabetes at higher risk of sustaining a fracture. Materials and Methods: To determine if bone loss is increased with type 2 diabetes, we analyzed data from the Health, Aging, and Body Composition Study of white and black well-functioning men and women 70-79 years of age. Hip BMD was measured at baseline and 4 years later in 480 (23{\%}) participants with diabetes, 439 with impaired glucose metabolism, and 1172 with normal glucose homeostasis (NG). Results: Those with diabetes had higher baseline hip BMD and weight, but among white women, had more weight loss over 4 years. White women with diabetes lost more femoral neck and total hip BMD than those with NG in age-adjusted models. After multivariable adjustment, diabetes was associated with greater loss of femoral neck BMD (-0.32{\%}/year; 95{\%} CI: -0.61, -0.02) but not total hip BMD. In men and black women, change in hip BMD was similar for participants with diabetes and NG. Conclusions: Despite having higher baseline BMD, diabetic white women, but not men or black women, had more rapid bone loss at the femoral neck than those with NG. This increased bone loss may contribute to the higher fracture risk observed in older diabetic women.",
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