Developmental consequences of intermittent and continuous prenatal exposure to 1,1,1-trichloroethane in mice

Hendrée E. Jones, Paul M. Kunko, Susan E. Robinson, Robert L. Balster

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The effects of 1,1,1-trichloroethane (TCE) on physical and behavioral development were examined in CD-1 mice prenatally exposed under two regimens. In the first study, pregnant mice were exposed to either 2,000 ppm TCE or filtered air for 17 hrs. during gestational days (GD) 12-17. A third group remained untreated. The results revealed no differences on pregnancy outcome. TCE-exposed pups gained less weight, exhibited delays in developmental landmarks and acquisition of the righting reflex, had poorer performance on tests of motor coordination and exhibited delays in negative geotaxis relative to sham or untreated pups. A second experiment was designed to more closely parallel the intermittent, acute, highconcentration pattern of solvent abuse. Pregnant mice were exposed for 60 min. to 8,000 ppm TCE or sham placement in exposure chambers three times/day during GD's 12-17. The results were very similar to what were obtained in the more continuous exposure study. TCE-exposed pups gained less weight, had delays in developmental landmarks and acquisition of the righting reflex and exhibited weaker grip strength, poorer negative geotaxis and less rooting intensity in comparison to sham pups. These data provide evidence for the behavioral and developmental teratogenicity of prenatal TCE exposure late in gestation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)635-646
Number of pages12
JournalPharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior
Volume55
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1996

Keywords

  • 1,1,1-trichloroethane
  • CD-1 mice
  • behavioral teratology
  • development
  • fetotoxicity
  • haloalkanes
  • inhalant abuse
  • pregnancy
  • prenatal exposure

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Toxicology
  • Pharmacology
  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Biological Psychiatry
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

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