Developmental alterations in serotoninergic neurotransmission in Borna disease virus (BDV)-infected rats: A multidisciplinary analysis

David M. Dietz, Michael W. Vogel, Steven A. Rubin, Timothy H Moran, Kathryn M. Carbone, Mikhail Pletnikov

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Neonatal Borna disease virus (BDV) infection of the rat brain serves as a valuable model for studying the pathogenesis of neurodevelopmental abnormalities following early brain injury. Previous experiments have demonstrated significant alterations in regional tissue content of serotonin (5-HT) in neonatally BDV-infected Lewis rats. The present study sought to provide more insights into postnatal virus-associated alterations in 5-HT neurotransmission by evaluating the density of 5-HT1a receptors in the hippocampus and 5-HT2a receptors in the cortex, regional 5-HT tissue concentrations, behavioral responses to a 5-HT agonist, quipazine, and numbers of neurons in specific subfields of the hippocampus on days 7, 14, and 30 after neonatal BDV infection in Lewis rats. Neonatal BDV infection was found to be associated with a gradual increase in the density of 5-HT2a and 5-HT1a postsynaptic receptors followed by an elevation of 5-HT contents at both the levels of synaptic terminals (i.e., cortex and hippocampus) and cell bodies (i.e., raphe nuclei). In addition, there was an enhanced behavioral response to quipazine. Virus-associated neurochemical and behavioral changes were accompanied by a decline in the number of neurons in the dentate gyrus and in the CA1 field of the hippocampus. No change in the number of neurons in the CA3/2 field of the hippocampus was observed. The present pattern of BDV-associated alterations in 5-HT brain system along with available data from other laboratories suggest that BDV might compromise axonal transport and/or release of 5-HT, resulting in decreased 5-HT neurotransmission.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)267-277
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of NeuroVirology
Volume10
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2004

Fingerprint

Borna disease virus
Synaptic Transmission
Serotonin
Infant, Newborn, Diseases
Virus Diseases
Quipazine
Hippocampus
Neurons
Hippocampal CA3 Region
Viruses
Hippocampal CA1 Region
Serotonin Receptor Agonists
Axonal Transport
Raphe Nuclei
Dentate Gyrus
Presynaptic Terminals
Brain
Brain Injuries

Keywords

  • Animal model
  • Borna
  • Developmental behavioral disorders
  • Serotonin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Virology
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Developmental alterations in serotoninergic neurotransmission in Borna disease virus (BDV)-infected rats : A multidisciplinary analysis. / Dietz, David M.; Vogel, Michael W.; Rubin, Steven A.; Moran, Timothy H; Carbone, Kathryn M.; Pletnikov, Mikhail.

In: Journal of NeuroVirology, Vol. 10, No. 5, 10.2004, p. 267-277.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{192d2b634be042c380e3cc322b1beaf8,
title = "Developmental alterations in serotoninergic neurotransmission in Borna disease virus (BDV)-infected rats: A multidisciplinary analysis",
abstract = "Neonatal Borna disease virus (BDV) infection of the rat brain serves as a valuable model for studying the pathogenesis of neurodevelopmental abnormalities following early brain injury. Previous experiments have demonstrated significant alterations in regional tissue content of serotonin (5-HT) in neonatally BDV-infected Lewis rats. The present study sought to provide more insights into postnatal virus-associated alterations in 5-HT neurotransmission by evaluating the density of 5-HT1a receptors in the hippocampus and 5-HT2a receptors in the cortex, regional 5-HT tissue concentrations, behavioral responses to a 5-HT agonist, quipazine, and numbers of neurons in specific subfields of the hippocampus on days 7, 14, and 30 after neonatal BDV infection in Lewis rats. Neonatal BDV infection was found to be associated with a gradual increase in the density of 5-HT2a and 5-HT1a postsynaptic receptors followed by an elevation of 5-HT contents at both the levels of synaptic terminals (i.e., cortex and hippocampus) and cell bodies (i.e., raphe nuclei). In addition, there was an enhanced behavioral response to quipazine. Virus-associated neurochemical and behavioral changes were accompanied by a decline in the number of neurons in the dentate gyrus and in the CA1 field of the hippocampus. No change in the number of neurons in the CA3/2 field of the hippocampus was observed. The present pattern of BDV-associated alterations in 5-HT brain system along with available data from other laboratories suggest that BDV might compromise axonal transport and/or release of 5-HT, resulting in decreased 5-HT neurotransmission.",
keywords = "Animal model, Borna, Developmental behavioral disorders, Serotonin",
author = "Dietz, {David M.} and Vogel, {Michael W.} and Rubin, {Steven A.} and Moran, {Timothy H} and Carbone, {Kathryn M.} and Mikhail Pletnikov",
year = "2004",
month = "10",
doi = "10.1080/13550280490499506",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "10",
pages = "267--277",
journal = "Journal of NeuroVirology",
issn = "1355-0284",
publisher = "Springer New York",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Developmental alterations in serotoninergic neurotransmission in Borna disease virus (BDV)-infected rats

T2 - A multidisciplinary analysis

AU - Dietz, David M.

AU - Vogel, Michael W.

AU - Rubin, Steven A.

AU - Moran, Timothy H

AU - Carbone, Kathryn M.

AU - Pletnikov, Mikhail

PY - 2004/10

Y1 - 2004/10

N2 - Neonatal Borna disease virus (BDV) infection of the rat brain serves as a valuable model for studying the pathogenesis of neurodevelopmental abnormalities following early brain injury. Previous experiments have demonstrated significant alterations in regional tissue content of serotonin (5-HT) in neonatally BDV-infected Lewis rats. The present study sought to provide more insights into postnatal virus-associated alterations in 5-HT neurotransmission by evaluating the density of 5-HT1a receptors in the hippocampus and 5-HT2a receptors in the cortex, regional 5-HT tissue concentrations, behavioral responses to a 5-HT agonist, quipazine, and numbers of neurons in specific subfields of the hippocampus on days 7, 14, and 30 after neonatal BDV infection in Lewis rats. Neonatal BDV infection was found to be associated with a gradual increase in the density of 5-HT2a and 5-HT1a postsynaptic receptors followed by an elevation of 5-HT contents at both the levels of synaptic terminals (i.e., cortex and hippocampus) and cell bodies (i.e., raphe nuclei). In addition, there was an enhanced behavioral response to quipazine. Virus-associated neurochemical and behavioral changes were accompanied by a decline in the number of neurons in the dentate gyrus and in the CA1 field of the hippocampus. No change in the number of neurons in the CA3/2 field of the hippocampus was observed. The present pattern of BDV-associated alterations in 5-HT brain system along with available data from other laboratories suggest that BDV might compromise axonal transport and/or release of 5-HT, resulting in decreased 5-HT neurotransmission.

AB - Neonatal Borna disease virus (BDV) infection of the rat brain serves as a valuable model for studying the pathogenesis of neurodevelopmental abnormalities following early brain injury. Previous experiments have demonstrated significant alterations in regional tissue content of serotonin (5-HT) in neonatally BDV-infected Lewis rats. The present study sought to provide more insights into postnatal virus-associated alterations in 5-HT neurotransmission by evaluating the density of 5-HT1a receptors in the hippocampus and 5-HT2a receptors in the cortex, regional 5-HT tissue concentrations, behavioral responses to a 5-HT agonist, quipazine, and numbers of neurons in specific subfields of the hippocampus on days 7, 14, and 30 after neonatal BDV infection in Lewis rats. Neonatal BDV infection was found to be associated with a gradual increase in the density of 5-HT2a and 5-HT1a postsynaptic receptors followed by an elevation of 5-HT contents at both the levels of synaptic terminals (i.e., cortex and hippocampus) and cell bodies (i.e., raphe nuclei). In addition, there was an enhanced behavioral response to quipazine. Virus-associated neurochemical and behavioral changes were accompanied by a decline in the number of neurons in the dentate gyrus and in the CA1 field of the hippocampus. No change in the number of neurons in the CA3/2 field of the hippocampus was observed. The present pattern of BDV-associated alterations in 5-HT brain system along with available data from other laboratories suggest that BDV might compromise axonal transport and/or release of 5-HT, resulting in decreased 5-HT neurotransmission.

KW - Animal model

KW - Borna

KW - Developmental behavioral disorders

KW - Serotonin

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=7244260510&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=7244260510&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/13550280490499506

DO - 10.1080/13550280490499506

M3 - Article

C2 - 15385249

AN - SCOPUS:7244260510

VL - 10

SP - 267

EP - 277

JO - Journal of NeuroVirology

JF - Journal of NeuroVirology

SN - 1355-0284

IS - 5

ER -