Development of simulator guidelines for resident assessment in flexible endoscopy

Erica Sutton, Sheree Carter Chase, Rosemary Klein, Yue Zhu, Carlos Godinez, Yassar Youssef, Adrian Park

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Virtual reality (VR) simulators may hold a role in the assessment of trainee abilities independent of their role as instructional instruments. Thus, we piloted a course in flexible endoscopy to surgical trainees who had met Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education endoscopy requirements to establish the relationship between metrics produced by a VR endoscopic simulator and trainee ability. After a didactic session, we provided faculty instruction to senior residents for Case 1 upper endoscopy and colonoscopy modules on the CAE EndoscopyVR. Course conclusion was defined as a trainee meeting all proficiency standards in basic endoscopic procedures on the simulator. Simulator metrics and course evaluation comprised data. Eleven and eight residents participated in the colonoscopy and upper endoscopy courses, respectively. Average time to reach proficiency standards for esophagogastroduodenoscopy was 6 and 13 minutes for colonoscopy after a median of one (range, one to two) and one (range, one to four) task repetitions, respectively. Faculty instruction averaged 7.5 minutes of instruction per repetition. A subjective course evaluation demonstrated that the course improved learners' knowledge of the subject and comfort with endoscopic equipment. Within a VR-based curriculum, experienced residents rapidly achieved task proficiency. The resultant scores may be used as simulator guidelines for resident assessment and readiness to perform flexible endoscopy. Copyright Southeastern Surgical Congress. All rights reserved.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)14-22
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican Surgeon
Volume79
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 1 2013
Externally publishedYes

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Endoscopy
Guidelines
Colonoscopy
Digestive System Endoscopy
Graduate Medical Education
Accreditation
Curriculum
Equipment and Supplies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Sutton, E., Chase, S. C., Klein, R., Zhu, Y., Godinez, C., Youssef, Y., & Park, A. (2013). Development of simulator guidelines for resident assessment in flexible endoscopy. American Surgeon, 79(1), 14-22.

Development of simulator guidelines for resident assessment in flexible endoscopy. / Sutton, Erica; Chase, Sheree Carter; Klein, Rosemary; Zhu, Yue; Godinez, Carlos; Youssef, Yassar; Park, Adrian.

In: American Surgeon, Vol. 79, No. 1, 01.01.2013, p. 14-22.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sutton, E, Chase, SC, Klein, R, Zhu, Y, Godinez, C, Youssef, Y & Park, A 2013, 'Development of simulator guidelines for resident assessment in flexible endoscopy', American Surgeon, vol. 79, no. 1, pp. 14-22.
Sutton E, Chase SC, Klein R, Zhu Y, Godinez C, Youssef Y et al. Development of simulator guidelines for resident assessment in flexible endoscopy. American Surgeon. 2013 Jan 1;79(1):14-22.
Sutton, Erica ; Chase, Sheree Carter ; Klein, Rosemary ; Zhu, Yue ; Godinez, Carlos ; Youssef, Yassar ; Park, Adrian. / Development of simulator guidelines for resident assessment in flexible endoscopy. In: American Surgeon. 2013 ; Vol. 79, No. 1. pp. 14-22.
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