Development of a "survival" guide for substance users in Harlem, New York City

Stephanie H. Factor, Sandro Galea, Lucia Garcia De Duenas Geli, Megan Saynisch, Suzannah Blumenthal, Eric Canales, Michael Poulson, Mary Foley, David Vlahov

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    The community advisory board (CAB) of the Harlem Urban Research Center, which includes community service providers. Department of Health workers, and academics, identified substance users' health as an action priority. The CAB initiated the development of a wellness guide to provide informational support for substance users to improve access to community services. Focus groups of current and former users engaged substance users in the guide development process and determined the guide's content and "look." Focus group participants recommended calling this a "survival" guide. The guide will include three sections: (a) health information and how to navigate the system to obtain services, (b) a reference list of community services, and (c) relevant "hot-line" numbers. The design will incorporate local street art. Substance users continue to shape the guide through ongoing art workshops. Dissemination and evaluation of the guide will continue to involve substance users, community service providers, and academics.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)312-325
    Number of pages14
    JournalHealth Education and Behavior
    Volume29
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Jun 1 2002

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
    • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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  • Cite this

    Factor, S. H., Galea, S., Garcia De Duenas Geli, L., Saynisch, M., Blumenthal, S., Canales, E., Poulson, M., Foley, M., & Vlahov, D. (2002). Development of a "survival" guide for substance users in Harlem, New York City. Health Education and Behavior, 29(3), 312-325. https://doi.org/10.1177/1090198102029003004