Development of a replicable process for translating science into practical health education messages

Nadra C. Tyus, Randall J. Freeman, M Christopher Gibbons

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

There has been considerable discussion about translating science into practical messages, especially among urban minority and "hard-to- reach" populations. Unfortunately, many research findings rarely make it back in useful format to the general public. Few innovative techniques have been established that provide researchers with a systematic process for developing health awareness and prevention messages for priority populations. The purpose of this paper is to describe the early development and experience of a unique community-based participatory process used to develop health promotion messages for a predominantly low-income, black and African-American community in Baltimore, MD. Scientific research findings from peer-reviewed literature were identified by academic researchers. Researchers then taught the science to graphic design students and faculty. The graphic design students and faculty then worked with both community residents and researchers to transform this information into evidence-based public health education messages. The final products were culturally and educationally appropriate, health promotion messages reflecting urban imagery that were eagerly desired by the community. This early outcome is in contrast to many previously developed messages and materials created through processes with limited community involvement and by individuals with limited practical knowledge of local community culture or expertise in marketing or mass communication. This process may potentially be utilized as a community-based participatory approach to enhance the translation of scientific research into desirable and appropriate health education messages.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1505-1509
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of the National Medical Association
Volume98
Issue number9
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2006

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Keywords

  • African Americans
  • Education
  • Marketing
  • Minority health
  • Urban population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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