Development of a qualitative sequential immunoassay for characterizing the intrinsic properties of circulating cardiac troponin I

Yixin Lin, Qin Fu, Jie Zhu, Julie M Miller, Jennifer E. Van Eyk

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

BACKGROUND: With myocardial infarction (MI), cardiac troponin is released from the heart into circulation, where it can be detected with immunoassays independently quantifying cardiac troponin I (cTnI) or cTnT. There is, however, no single immunoassay that sequentially probes the posttranslational modification status of cTnI or directly characterizes whether circulating cTnI is bound to cTnC and/or cTnT. Here we describe the development of a qualitative immunoassay to directly probe the primary and ternary structure of circulating cTnI through diffractive optics technology (dotLab® System, Axela). METHODS: Anti-cTnI antibody 8I-7 was immobilized on a patterned sensor to capture cTnI. One or more detector antibodies were sequentially introduced to probe for amino acid sequence integrity or phosphorylation status of cTnI, or its association with cTnC and/or cTnT. Respective immunocaptures were recorded as real-time diffractive intensities (DIs), and the DI differences were analyzed. Each immunodetection was independent of the others but was done in a single sequential assay. RESULTS: This diffraction-based immunoassay successfully characterized cTnI. The unamplified assay determined whether cTnI was degraded at N-terminus and/or C-terminus or phosphorylated. Sequential application of multiple detector antibodies without an antibody-stripping step enables real-time interrogation of 5 different epitopes of cTnI, or direct detection of the cTn complex (cTnI-cTnC-cTnT) in a single sequential assay. Finally, this assay was optimized with amplification to directly detect circulating cTnI bound to cTnC and cTnT in serum from an MI patient. CONCLUSIONS: The dot® Immunoassay is the first qualitative sequential immunoassay to address the direct interactions of the troponin subunits and various modified forms of cTnI.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1307-1319
Number of pages13
JournalClinical Chemistry
Volume56
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2010

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Troponin I
Immunoassay
Assays
Troponin
Antibodies
Myocardial Infarction
Diffractive optics
Detectors
Phosphorylation
Post Translational Protein Processing
Amplification
Epitopes
Amino Acid Sequence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Biochemistry, medical

Cite this

Development of a qualitative sequential immunoassay for characterizing the intrinsic properties of circulating cardiac troponin I. / Lin, Yixin; Fu, Qin; Zhu, Jie; Miller, Julie M; Van Eyk, Jennifer E.

In: Clinical Chemistry, Vol. 56, No. 8, 08.2010, p. 1307-1319.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "BACKGROUND: With myocardial infarction (MI), cardiac troponin is released from the heart into circulation, where it can be detected with immunoassays independently quantifying cardiac troponin I (cTnI) or cTnT. There is, however, no single immunoassay that sequentially probes the posttranslational modification status of cTnI or directly characterizes whether circulating cTnI is bound to cTnC and/or cTnT. Here we describe the development of a qualitative immunoassay to directly probe the primary and ternary structure of circulating cTnI through diffractive optics technology (dotLab{\circledR} System, Axela). METHODS: Anti-cTnI antibody 8I-7 was immobilized on a patterned sensor to capture cTnI. One or more detector antibodies were sequentially introduced to probe for amino acid sequence integrity or phosphorylation status of cTnI, or its association with cTnC and/or cTnT. Respective immunocaptures were recorded as real-time diffractive intensities (DIs), and the DI differences were analyzed. Each immunodetection was independent of the others but was done in a single sequential assay. RESULTS: This diffraction-based immunoassay successfully characterized cTnI. The unamplified assay determined whether cTnI was degraded at N-terminus and/or C-terminus or phosphorylated. Sequential application of multiple detector antibodies without an antibody-stripping step enables real-time interrogation of 5 different epitopes of cTnI, or direct detection of the cTn complex (cTnI-cTnC-cTnT) in a single sequential assay. Finally, this assay was optimized with amplification to directly detect circulating cTnI bound to cTnC and cTnT in serum from an MI patient. CONCLUSIONS: The dot{\circledR} Immunoassay is the first qualitative sequential immunoassay to address the direct interactions of the troponin subunits and various modified forms of cTnI.",
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N2 - BACKGROUND: With myocardial infarction (MI), cardiac troponin is released from the heart into circulation, where it can be detected with immunoassays independently quantifying cardiac troponin I (cTnI) or cTnT. There is, however, no single immunoassay that sequentially probes the posttranslational modification status of cTnI or directly characterizes whether circulating cTnI is bound to cTnC and/or cTnT. Here we describe the development of a qualitative immunoassay to directly probe the primary and ternary structure of circulating cTnI through diffractive optics technology (dotLab® System, Axela). METHODS: Anti-cTnI antibody 8I-7 was immobilized on a patterned sensor to capture cTnI. One or more detector antibodies were sequentially introduced to probe for amino acid sequence integrity or phosphorylation status of cTnI, or its association with cTnC and/or cTnT. Respective immunocaptures were recorded as real-time diffractive intensities (DIs), and the DI differences were analyzed. Each immunodetection was independent of the others but was done in a single sequential assay. RESULTS: This diffraction-based immunoassay successfully characterized cTnI. The unamplified assay determined whether cTnI was degraded at N-terminus and/or C-terminus or phosphorylated. Sequential application of multiple detector antibodies without an antibody-stripping step enables real-time interrogation of 5 different epitopes of cTnI, or direct detection of the cTn complex (cTnI-cTnC-cTnT) in a single sequential assay. Finally, this assay was optimized with amplification to directly detect circulating cTnI bound to cTnC and cTnT in serum from an MI patient. CONCLUSIONS: The dot® Immunoassay is the first qualitative sequential immunoassay to address the direct interactions of the troponin subunits and various modified forms of cTnI.

AB - BACKGROUND: With myocardial infarction (MI), cardiac troponin is released from the heart into circulation, where it can be detected with immunoassays independently quantifying cardiac troponin I (cTnI) or cTnT. There is, however, no single immunoassay that sequentially probes the posttranslational modification status of cTnI or directly characterizes whether circulating cTnI is bound to cTnC and/or cTnT. Here we describe the development of a qualitative immunoassay to directly probe the primary and ternary structure of circulating cTnI through diffractive optics technology (dotLab® System, Axela). METHODS: Anti-cTnI antibody 8I-7 was immobilized on a patterned sensor to capture cTnI. One or more detector antibodies were sequentially introduced to probe for amino acid sequence integrity or phosphorylation status of cTnI, or its association with cTnC and/or cTnT. Respective immunocaptures were recorded as real-time diffractive intensities (DIs), and the DI differences were analyzed. Each immunodetection was independent of the others but was done in a single sequential assay. RESULTS: This diffraction-based immunoassay successfully characterized cTnI. The unamplified assay determined whether cTnI was degraded at N-terminus and/or C-terminus or phosphorylated. Sequential application of multiple detector antibodies without an antibody-stripping step enables real-time interrogation of 5 different epitopes of cTnI, or direct detection of the cTn complex (cTnI-cTnC-cTnT) in a single sequential assay. Finally, this assay was optimized with amplification to directly detect circulating cTnI bound to cTnC and cTnT in serum from an MI patient. CONCLUSIONS: The dot® Immunoassay is the first qualitative sequential immunoassay to address the direct interactions of the troponin subunits and various modified forms of cTnI.

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