Development of a canine multidrug chemotherapeutic model using doxorubicin, cisplatin, and ifosfamide

K. Ikeda, R. L. Waltrip, N. Inoue, F. J. Frassica, E. Y S Chao

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to develop a safe and clinically relevant canine experimental model for multidrug chemotherapy administration utilizing doxorubicin (ADR), cisplatin (CDP), and ifosfamide (IFX). Though these agents are commonly used in clinical orthopaedic oncology, their effects on orthopaedic reconstructive procedures after tumor resection have not been explored. Prior to our study, an appropriate experimental model did not exist. Our experiment was divided into 2 steps. Two dogs were used for step 1. Dosages in the first step, which were determined using single agent protocols, were as follows: ADR, 30 mg/m2; CDP, 75 mg/m2; and IFX, 450 mg/m2. This combined regimen led to sepsis and death in both dogs soon after the first cycle. Therefore, in the second step, dosages were reduced as follows: ADR, 20 mg/m2; CDP, 50 mg/m2; and IFX, 300 mg/m2. Four dogs were used for step 2. All 4 dogs survived three full cycles with serious myelosuppression but no other significant laboratory abnormalities. No haematuria or proteinuria occurred throughout the course, and no significant pathological findings were observed at autopsy. In conclusion, this clinically relevant regimen is tolerated by the canine and may be used as a model for further studies of chemotherapy effects.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)277-281
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Experimental and Clinical Cancer Research
Volume15
Issue number3
StatePublished - Sep 1996

Fingerprint

Ifosfamide
Cytidine Diphosphate
Doxorubicin
Cisplatin
Canidae
Dogs
Theoretical Models
Orthopedic Procedures
Drug Therapy
Medical Oncology
Hematuria
Proteinuria
Orthopedics
Autopsy
Sepsis
Neoplasms

Keywords

  • Canine model
  • Chemotherapy
  • Cisplatin
  • Doxorubicin
  • Ifosfamide

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

Cite this

Development of a canine multidrug chemotherapeutic model using doxorubicin, cisplatin, and ifosfamide. / Ikeda, K.; Waltrip, R. L.; Inoue, N.; Frassica, F. J.; Chao, E. Y S.

In: Journal of Experimental and Clinical Cancer Research, Vol. 15, No. 3, 09.1996, p. 277-281.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ikeda, K. ; Waltrip, R. L. ; Inoue, N. ; Frassica, F. J. ; Chao, E. Y S. / Development of a canine multidrug chemotherapeutic model using doxorubicin, cisplatin, and ifosfamide. In: Journal of Experimental and Clinical Cancer Research. 1996 ; Vol. 15, No. 3. pp. 277-281.
@article{7d5cb8cb33644aa8bfbfede79a89028c,
title = "Development of a canine multidrug chemotherapeutic model using doxorubicin, cisplatin, and ifosfamide",
abstract = "The purpose of this study was to develop a safe and clinically relevant canine experimental model for multidrug chemotherapy administration utilizing doxorubicin (ADR), cisplatin (CDP), and ifosfamide (IFX). Though these agents are commonly used in clinical orthopaedic oncology, their effects on orthopaedic reconstructive procedures after tumor resection have not been explored. Prior to our study, an appropriate experimental model did not exist. Our experiment was divided into 2 steps. Two dogs were used for step 1. Dosages in the first step, which were determined using single agent protocols, were as follows: ADR, 30 mg/m2; CDP, 75 mg/m2; and IFX, 450 mg/m2. This combined regimen led to sepsis and death in both dogs soon after the first cycle. Therefore, in the second step, dosages were reduced as follows: ADR, 20 mg/m2; CDP, 50 mg/m2; and IFX, 300 mg/m2. Four dogs were used for step 2. All 4 dogs survived three full cycles with serious myelosuppression but no other significant laboratory abnormalities. No haematuria or proteinuria occurred throughout the course, and no significant pathological findings were observed at autopsy. In conclusion, this clinically relevant regimen is tolerated by the canine and may be used as a model for further studies of chemotherapy effects.",
keywords = "Canine model, Chemotherapy, Cisplatin, Doxorubicin, Ifosfamide",
author = "K. Ikeda and Waltrip, {R. L.} and N. Inoue and Frassica, {F. J.} and Chao, {E. Y S}",
year = "1996",
month = "9",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "15",
pages = "277--281",
journal = "Journal of Experimental and Clinical Cancer Research",
issn = "0392-9078",
publisher = "BioMed Central",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Development of a canine multidrug chemotherapeutic model using doxorubicin, cisplatin, and ifosfamide

AU - Ikeda, K.

AU - Waltrip, R. L.

AU - Inoue, N.

AU - Frassica, F. J.

AU - Chao, E. Y S

PY - 1996/9

Y1 - 1996/9

N2 - The purpose of this study was to develop a safe and clinically relevant canine experimental model for multidrug chemotherapy administration utilizing doxorubicin (ADR), cisplatin (CDP), and ifosfamide (IFX). Though these agents are commonly used in clinical orthopaedic oncology, their effects on orthopaedic reconstructive procedures after tumor resection have not been explored. Prior to our study, an appropriate experimental model did not exist. Our experiment was divided into 2 steps. Two dogs were used for step 1. Dosages in the first step, which were determined using single agent protocols, were as follows: ADR, 30 mg/m2; CDP, 75 mg/m2; and IFX, 450 mg/m2. This combined regimen led to sepsis and death in both dogs soon after the first cycle. Therefore, in the second step, dosages were reduced as follows: ADR, 20 mg/m2; CDP, 50 mg/m2; and IFX, 300 mg/m2. Four dogs were used for step 2. All 4 dogs survived three full cycles with serious myelosuppression but no other significant laboratory abnormalities. No haematuria or proteinuria occurred throughout the course, and no significant pathological findings were observed at autopsy. In conclusion, this clinically relevant regimen is tolerated by the canine and may be used as a model for further studies of chemotherapy effects.

AB - The purpose of this study was to develop a safe and clinically relevant canine experimental model for multidrug chemotherapy administration utilizing doxorubicin (ADR), cisplatin (CDP), and ifosfamide (IFX). Though these agents are commonly used in clinical orthopaedic oncology, their effects on orthopaedic reconstructive procedures after tumor resection have not been explored. Prior to our study, an appropriate experimental model did not exist. Our experiment was divided into 2 steps. Two dogs were used for step 1. Dosages in the first step, which were determined using single agent protocols, were as follows: ADR, 30 mg/m2; CDP, 75 mg/m2; and IFX, 450 mg/m2. This combined regimen led to sepsis and death in both dogs soon after the first cycle. Therefore, in the second step, dosages were reduced as follows: ADR, 20 mg/m2; CDP, 50 mg/m2; and IFX, 300 mg/m2. Four dogs were used for step 2. All 4 dogs survived three full cycles with serious myelosuppression but no other significant laboratory abnormalities. No haematuria or proteinuria occurred throughout the course, and no significant pathological findings were observed at autopsy. In conclusion, this clinically relevant regimen is tolerated by the canine and may be used as a model for further studies of chemotherapy effects.

KW - Canine model

KW - Chemotherapy

KW - Cisplatin

KW - Doxorubicin

KW - Ifosfamide

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0029954525&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0029954525&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:0029954525

VL - 15

SP - 277

EP - 281

JO - Journal of Experimental and Clinical Cancer Research

JF - Journal of Experimental and Clinical Cancer Research

SN - 0392-9078

IS - 3

ER -