Development and validation of an attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) executive function and behavior rating screening battery

James B. Hale, Linda A. Reddy, Scott L. Decker, Rebecca Thompson, Julie Henzel, Annemarie Teodori, Elizabeth Forrest, Eleazar Eusebio, Martha Bridge Denckla

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Attention problems are ubiquitous in clinical practice, commonly found in many childhood learning and behavior disorders. Practitioners need cost- and time-effective methods for determining whether children have attention problems due to attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) or numerous other conditions. This study examined the utility of a 15-minute ADHD screening battery designed to differentiate ADHD (including inattentive, IT, and combined, CT, subtypes), specific learning disability (SLD), and typical child samples. Results for the 368 children (age 6 to 12 years) revealed that the Trail Making Test-Part B (Time/Errors), Hale-Denckla Cancellation Test (Time/Correct), and Child Attention Profile (Inattention/Overactivity) teacher ratings discriminated between typical and ADHD groups (87% correct classification; sensitivity =.64; specificity =.92) and differentiated between IT, CT, and SLD groups (80% correct classification; IT sensitivity =.82, and specificity =.96; CT sensitivity =.84, and specificity =.82). Discriminant function and Bonferroni post hoc results revealed different neuropsychological and behavioral patterns among groups.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)897-912
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology
Volume31
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2009

Keywords

  • Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder
  • Discriminant validity
  • Executive functions
  • Frontal-subcortical circuits
  • Screening battery

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

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