Development and preliminary evaluation of an online educational video about whole-genome sequencing for research participants, patients, and the general public

Saskia C. Sanderson, Sabrina A. Suckiel, Micol Zweig, Erwin P. Bottinger, Ethylin Wang Jabs, Lynne D. Richardson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background:As whole-genome sequencing (WGS) increases in availability, WGS educational aids are needed for research participants, patients, and the general public. Our aim was therefore to develop an accessible and scalable WGS educational aid.Methods:We engaged multiple stakeholders in an iterative process over a 1-year period culminating in the production of a novel 10-minute WGS educational animated video, "Whole Genome Sequencing and You" (https://goo.gl/HV8ezJ). We then presented the animated video to 281 online-survey respondents (the video-information group). There were also two comparison groups: a written-information group (n = 281) and a no-information group (n = 300).Results:In the video-information group, 79% reported the video was easy to understand, satisfaction scores were high (mean 4.00 on 1-5 scale, where 5 = high satisfaction), and knowledge increased significantly. There were significant differences in knowledge compared with the no-information group but few differences compared with the written-information group. Intention to receive personal results from WGS and decisional conflict in response to a hypothetical scenario did not differ between the three groups.Conclusions:The educational animated video, "Whole Genome Sequencing and You," was well received by this sample of online-survey respondents. Further work is needed to evaluate its utility as an aid to informed decision making about WGS in other populations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)501-512
Number of pages12
JournalGenetics in Medicine
Volume18
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2016
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Genome
Research
Decision Making
Surveys and Questionnaires
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics(clinical)

Cite this

Development and preliminary evaluation of an online educational video about whole-genome sequencing for research participants, patients, and the general public. / Sanderson, Saskia C.; Suckiel, Sabrina A.; Zweig, Micol; Bottinger, Erwin P.; Jabs, Ethylin Wang; Richardson, Lynne D.

In: Genetics in Medicine, Vol. 18, No. 5, 01.05.2016, p. 501-512.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sanderson, Saskia C. ; Suckiel, Sabrina A. ; Zweig, Micol ; Bottinger, Erwin P. ; Jabs, Ethylin Wang ; Richardson, Lynne D. / Development and preliminary evaluation of an online educational video about whole-genome sequencing for research participants, patients, and the general public. In: Genetics in Medicine. 2016 ; Vol. 18, No. 5. pp. 501-512.
@article{54f2d0275682444b8b47a2d8c9552472,
title = "Development and preliminary evaluation of an online educational video about whole-genome sequencing for research participants, patients, and the general public",
abstract = "Background:As whole-genome sequencing (WGS) increases in availability, WGS educational aids are needed for research participants, patients, and the general public. Our aim was therefore to develop an accessible and scalable WGS educational aid.Methods:We engaged multiple stakeholders in an iterative process over a 1-year period culminating in the production of a novel 10-minute WGS educational animated video, {"}Whole Genome Sequencing and You{"} (https://goo.gl/HV8ezJ). We then presented the animated video to 281 online-survey respondents (the video-information group). There were also two comparison groups: a written-information group (n = 281) and a no-information group (n = 300).Results:In the video-information group, 79{\%} reported the video was easy to understand, satisfaction scores were high (mean 4.00 on 1-5 scale, where 5 = high satisfaction), and knowledge increased significantly. There were significant differences in knowledge compared with the no-information group but few differences compared with the written-information group. Intention to receive personal results from WGS and decisional conflict in response to a hypothetical scenario did not differ between the three groups.Conclusions:The educational animated video, {"}Whole Genome Sequencing and You,{"} was well received by this sample of online-survey respondents. Further work is needed to evaluate its utility as an aid to informed decision making about WGS in other populations.",
author = "Sanderson, {Saskia C.} and Suckiel, {Sabrina A.} and Micol Zweig and Bottinger, {Erwin P.} and Jabs, {Ethylin Wang} and Richardson, {Lynne D.}",
year = "2016",
month = "5",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1038/gim.2015.118",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "18",
pages = "501--512",
journal = "Genetics in Medicine",
issn = "1098-3600",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Development and preliminary evaluation of an online educational video about whole-genome sequencing for research participants, patients, and the general public

AU - Sanderson, Saskia C.

AU - Suckiel, Sabrina A.

AU - Zweig, Micol

AU - Bottinger, Erwin P.

AU - Jabs, Ethylin Wang

AU - Richardson, Lynne D.

PY - 2016/5/1

Y1 - 2016/5/1

N2 - Background:As whole-genome sequencing (WGS) increases in availability, WGS educational aids are needed for research participants, patients, and the general public. Our aim was therefore to develop an accessible and scalable WGS educational aid.Methods:We engaged multiple stakeholders in an iterative process over a 1-year period culminating in the production of a novel 10-minute WGS educational animated video, "Whole Genome Sequencing and You" (https://goo.gl/HV8ezJ). We then presented the animated video to 281 online-survey respondents (the video-information group). There were also two comparison groups: a written-information group (n = 281) and a no-information group (n = 300).Results:In the video-information group, 79% reported the video was easy to understand, satisfaction scores were high (mean 4.00 on 1-5 scale, where 5 = high satisfaction), and knowledge increased significantly. There were significant differences in knowledge compared with the no-information group but few differences compared with the written-information group. Intention to receive personal results from WGS and decisional conflict in response to a hypothetical scenario did not differ between the three groups.Conclusions:The educational animated video, "Whole Genome Sequencing and You," was well received by this sample of online-survey respondents. Further work is needed to evaluate its utility as an aid to informed decision making about WGS in other populations.

AB - Background:As whole-genome sequencing (WGS) increases in availability, WGS educational aids are needed for research participants, patients, and the general public. Our aim was therefore to develop an accessible and scalable WGS educational aid.Methods:We engaged multiple stakeholders in an iterative process over a 1-year period culminating in the production of a novel 10-minute WGS educational animated video, "Whole Genome Sequencing and You" (https://goo.gl/HV8ezJ). We then presented the animated video to 281 online-survey respondents (the video-information group). There were also two comparison groups: a written-information group (n = 281) and a no-information group (n = 300).Results:In the video-information group, 79% reported the video was easy to understand, satisfaction scores were high (mean 4.00 on 1-5 scale, where 5 = high satisfaction), and knowledge increased significantly. There were significant differences in knowledge compared with the no-information group but few differences compared with the written-information group. Intention to receive personal results from WGS and decisional conflict in response to a hypothetical scenario did not differ between the three groups.Conclusions:The educational animated video, "Whole Genome Sequencing and You," was well received by this sample of online-survey respondents. Further work is needed to evaluate its utility as an aid to informed decision making about WGS in other populations.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84964866092&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84964866092&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1038/gim.2015.118

DO - 10.1038/gim.2015.118

M3 - Article

C2 - 26334178

AN - SCOPUS:84964866092

VL - 18

SP - 501

EP - 512

JO - Genetics in Medicine

JF - Genetics in Medicine

SN - 1098-3600

IS - 5

ER -