Development and pilot study of a marketing strategy for primary care/Internet-based depression prevention intervention for adolescents (the CATCH-IT intervention)

Benjamin W. van Voorhees, Natalie Watson, John F P Bridges, Joshua Fogel, Jill Galas, Clarke Kramer, Marc Connery, Ann McGill, Monika Marko, Alonso Cardenas, Josephine Landsback, Karoline Dmochowska, Sachiko A. Kuwabara, Justin Ellis, Micah Prochaska, Carl Bell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Adolescent depression is both common and burdensome, and while evidence-based strategies have been developed to prevent adolescent depression, participation in such interventions remains extremely low, with less than 3% of at-risk individuals participating. To promote participation in evidence-based preventive strategies, a rigorous marketing strategy is needed to translate research into practice. Objective: To develop and pilot a rigorous marketing strategy for engaging at-risk individuals with an Internet-based depression prevention intervention in primary care targeting key attitudes and beliefs. Method: A marketing design group was constituted to develop a marketing strategy based on the principles of targeting, positioning/competitor analysis, decision analysis, and promotion/distribution and incorporating contemporary models of behavior change. We evaluated the formative quality of the intervention and observed the fielding experience for prevention using a pilot study (observational) design. Results: The marketing plan focused on "resiliency building" rather than "depression intervention" and was relayed by office staff and the Internet site. Twelve practices successfully implemented the intervention and recruited a diverse sample of adolescents with >30% of all those with positive screens and >80% of those eligible after phone assessment enrolling in the study with a cost of $58 per enrollee. Adolescent motivation for depression prevention (1-10 scale) increased from a baseline mean value of 7.45 (SD=2.05) to 8.07 poststudy (SD=1.33) (P=.048). Conclusions: Marketing strategies for preventive interventions for mental disorders can be developed and successfully introduced and marketed in primary care.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalPrimary Care Companion to the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry
Volume12
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2010

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Marketing
Internet
Primary Health Care
Depression
Decision Support Techniques
Mental Disorders
Motivation
Costs and Cost Analysis
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Development and pilot study of a marketing strategy for primary care/Internet-based depression prevention intervention for adolescents (the CATCH-IT intervention). / van Voorhees, Benjamin W.; Watson, Natalie; Bridges, John F P; Fogel, Joshua; Galas, Jill; Kramer, Clarke; Connery, Marc; McGill, Ann; Marko, Monika; Cardenas, Alonso; Landsback, Josephine; Dmochowska, Karoline; Kuwabara, Sachiko A.; Ellis, Justin; Prochaska, Micah; Bell, Carl.

In: Primary Care Companion to the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, Vol. 12, No. 3, 2010.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

van Voorhees, BW, Watson, N, Bridges, JFP, Fogel, J, Galas, J, Kramer, C, Connery, M, McGill, A, Marko, M, Cardenas, A, Landsback, J, Dmochowska, K, Kuwabara, SA, Ellis, J, Prochaska, M & Bell, C 2010, 'Development and pilot study of a marketing strategy for primary care/Internet-based depression prevention intervention for adolescents (the CATCH-IT intervention)', Primary Care Companion to the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, vol. 12, no. 3. https://doi.org/10.4088/PCC.09m00791blu
van Voorhees, Benjamin W. ; Watson, Natalie ; Bridges, John F P ; Fogel, Joshua ; Galas, Jill ; Kramer, Clarke ; Connery, Marc ; McGill, Ann ; Marko, Monika ; Cardenas, Alonso ; Landsback, Josephine ; Dmochowska, Karoline ; Kuwabara, Sachiko A. ; Ellis, Justin ; Prochaska, Micah ; Bell, Carl. / Development and pilot study of a marketing strategy for primary care/Internet-based depression prevention intervention for adolescents (the CATCH-IT intervention). In: Primary Care Companion to the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry. 2010 ; Vol. 12, No. 3.
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AU - Watson, Natalie

AU - Bridges, John F P

AU - Fogel, Joshua

AU - Galas, Jill

AU - Kramer, Clarke

AU - Connery, Marc

AU - McGill, Ann

AU - Marko, Monika

AU - Cardenas, Alonso

AU - Landsback, Josephine

AU - Dmochowska, Karoline

AU - Kuwabara, Sachiko A.

AU - Ellis, Justin

AU - Prochaska, Micah

AU - Bell, Carl

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