Developing U.S. oversight strategies for nanobiotechnology: Learning from past oversight experiences

Jordan Paradise, Susan M. Wolf, Jennifer Kuzma, Aliya Kuzhabekova, Alison W. Tisdale, Efrosini Kokkoli, Gurumurthy Ramachandran

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The emergence of nanotechnology, and specifically nanobiotechnology, raises major oversight challenges. In the United States, government, industry, and researchers are debating what oversight approaches are most appropriate. Among the federal agencies already embroiled in discussion of oversight approaches are the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Department of Agriculture (USDA), Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), and National Institutes of Health (NIH). All can learn from assessment of the successes and failures of past oversight efforts aimed at emerging technologies. This article reports on work funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) aimed at learning the lessons of past oversight efforts. The article offers insights that emerge from comparing five oversight case studies that examine oversight of genetically engineered organisms (GEOs) in the food supply, pharmaceuticals, medical devices, chemicals in the workplace, and gene therapy. Using quantitative and qualitative analysis, the authors present a new way of evaluating oversight.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)688-705
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of Law, Medicine and Ethics
Volume37
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2009
Externally publishedYes

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Genetically Modified Organisms
United States Occupational Safety and Health Administration
State Government
United States Department of Agriculture
United States Environmental Protection Agency
Nanotechnology
Food Supply
National Institutes of Health (U.S.)
United States Food and Drug Administration
Agriculture
Workplace
Genetic Therapy
Industry
Research Personnel
Learning
Technology
Equipment and Supplies
Pharmaceutical Preparations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy
  • Issues, ethics and legal aspects

Cite this

Developing U.S. oversight strategies for nanobiotechnology : Learning from past oversight experiences. / Paradise, Jordan; Wolf, Susan M.; Kuzma, Jennifer; Kuzhabekova, Aliya; Tisdale, Alison W.; Kokkoli, Efrosini; Ramachandran, Gurumurthy.

In: Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics, Vol. 37, No. 4, 12.2009, p. 688-705.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Paradise, Jordan ; Wolf, Susan M. ; Kuzma, Jennifer ; Kuzhabekova, Aliya ; Tisdale, Alison W. ; Kokkoli, Efrosini ; Ramachandran, Gurumurthy. / Developing U.S. oversight strategies for nanobiotechnology : Learning from past oversight experiences. In: Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics. 2009 ; Vol. 37, No. 4. pp. 688-705.
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