Developing Therapies for Brain Tumors: The Impact of the Johns Hopkins Hunterian Neurosurgical Research Laboratory

Henry Brem, Eric W. Sankey, Ann Liu, Antonella Mangraviti, Betty M. Tyler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The Johns Hopkins Hunterian Neurosurgical Laboratory at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine was created in 1904 by Harvey Cushing and William Halsted and has had a long history of fostering surgical training, encouraging basis science research, and facilitating translational application. Over the past 30 years, the laboratory has addressed the paucity of brain tumor therapies. Pre-clinical work from the laboratory led to the development of carmustine wafers with initial US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval in 1996. Combining carmustine wafers, radiation, and temozolomide led to a significant increase in the median survival of patients with glioblastoma. The laboratory has also developed microchips and immunotherapy to further extend survival in this heretofore underserved population. These achievements were made possible by the dedication, commitment, and creativity of more than 300 trainees of the Hunterian Neurosurgical Laboratory. The laboratory demonstrates the beneficial influence of research experience as well its substantial impact on the field of biomedical research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)55-74
Number of pages20
JournalTransactions of the American Clinical and Climatological Association
Volume128
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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