Developing Culturally Appropriate Interventions to Prevent Person-to-Person Transmission of Nipah Virus in Bangladesh: Cultural Epidemiology in Action

M. Saiful Islam, Stephen P. Luby, Emily Gurley

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Nipah virus is an emerging zoonotic disease that has occasionally been transmitted from person to person. In Bangladesh family members provide most of the hands-on care to patients in public hospitals. They expose themselves to patient saliva (and risk of disease transmission) by sleeping in the same bed, sharing patient's uneaten food, and receiving a cough or sneeze in the face. This chapter provides an example of developing culturally appropriate messages through a complementary epidemiological and anthropological approach to limit caregiver exposure to patient bodily fluids, especially saliva. Recovered encephalitis patients and their caregivers were given a set of messages and then asked about the feasibility and cultural acceptability of the messages. Respondents were generally accepting, with many relating these messages with cleanliness, and suggested providing soap for hand washing and pictorial cards as memory aids. Suggestions to alter behavior based on a biomedical understanding of disease transmission were considered acceptable provided the benefits were properly explained.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationWhen Culture Impacts Health
Subtitle of host publicationGlobal Lessons for Effective Health Research
PublisherElsevier Inc.
Pages329-337
Number of pages9
ISBN (Print)9780124159211
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2013
Externally publishedYes

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Keywords

  • Behavior change message
  • Cultural epidemiology
  • Culture
  • Family caregivers
  • Nipah virus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dentistry(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Islam, M. S., Luby, S. P., & Gurley, E. (2013). Developing Culturally Appropriate Interventions to Prevent Person-to-Person Transmission of Nipah Virus in Bangladesh: Cultural Epidemiology in Action. In When Culture Impacts Health: Global Lessons for Effective Health Research (pp. 329-337). Elsevier Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-415921-1.00028-2