Determination of the role for CD21 during Epstein-Barr virus infection of B-lymphoblastoid cells

Don R. Martin, Robert L. Marlowe, Joseph M. Ahearn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), a herpesvirus with oncogenic potential, is camouflaged with glycoprotein 350/220 which mimics the human ligand C3dg and thereby binds to and exploits complement receptor type 2 (CR2; CD21), the EBV receptor. It has not been possible to determine the role of CR2 during postbinding events at viral infection because all B lymphocytes express endogenous CR2, precluding an informative study of receptor mutants. We have overcome this obstacle through creation of a novel experimental system based on molecular dissection of the ligand-binding domains of human CR2 and murine CR2. Our results demonstrate first, that two discontinuous amino acid substitutions within the ligand-binding domain of murine CR2 render it capable of mediating EBV infection of human B-lymphoblastoid cells, and second, that the specific role of CR2 during EBV infection is to capture virions at the cell surface, after which cofactors not associated with CR2 mediate postbinding events. These are the first studies to be described in which a cell that is normally susceptible in viral infection can be manipulated so as to direct entry of virions via recombinant or endogenous receptors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)4716-4726
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Virology
Volume68
Issue number8
StatePublished - Aug 1994

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Human herpesvirus 4
Epstein-Barr Virus Infections
Complement 3d Receptors
B-lymphocytes
Virus Diseases
Ligands
Virion
virion
infection
receptors
Herpesviridae
Amino Acid Substitution
Human Herpesvirus 4
Dissection
Glycoproteins
mice
amino acid substitution
B-Lymphocytes
glycoproteins
complement

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology

Cite this

Martin, D. R., Marlowe, R. L., & Ahearn, J. M. (1994). Determination of the role for CD21 during Epstein-Barr virus infection of B-lymphoblastoid cells. Journal of Virology, 68(8), 4716-4726.

Determination of the role for CD21 during Epstein-Barr virus infection of B-lymphoblastoid cells. / Martin, Don R.; Marlowe, Robert L.; Ahearn, Joseph M.

In: Journal of Virology, Vol. 68, No. 8, 08.1994, p. 4716-4726.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Martin, DR, Marlowe, RL & Ahearn, JM 1994, 'Determination of the role for CD21 during Epstein-Barr virus infection of B-lymphoblastoid cells', Journal of Virology, vol. 68, no. 8, pp. 4716-4726.
Martin, Don R. ; Marlowe, Robert L. ; Ahearn, Joseph M. / Determination of the role for CD21 during Epstein-Barr virus infection of B-lymphoblastoid cells. In: Journal of Virology. 1994 ; Vol. 68, No. 8. pp. 4716-4726.
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