Determination of protein structures in situ

Electron tomography of intact viruses and cells

Sriram Subramaniam

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Electron tomography is a powerful tool for investigation of the three-dimensional structures of large sub-cellular assemblies at resolutions one to two orders of magnitude higher than what is currently achieved using light microscopy. This field has seen a significant burst of activity in the last few years with the availability of tools for automated data acquisition using modern computerized microscopes. Efforts at imaging complex assemblies at room temperature using stained specimens, as well as cryogenic temperatures using unstained specimens have rapidly begun to provide many new insights into the 3D architecture of cells and viruses. In our laboratory, we are using three-dimensional electron microscopy as a tool to discover and analyze the spatial architectures of receptors and membrane assemblies in viruses, cells and tissues. The electron microscopic studies bridge the gap between cellular and molecular structure, and provide a foundation to integrate the structural information with biochemical and genetic analyses. Here, I focus on challenges in using electron tomography to extract structural information on proteins and protein complexes by molecular averaging (text is based largely on material presented in Subramaniam 2006 [1] and Zhang et al 2006 [2]).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication2007 4th IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging: From Nano to Macro - Proceedings
Pages233-235
Number of pages3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2007
Externally publishedYes
Event2007 4th IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging: From Nano to Macro; ISBI'07 - Arlington, VA, United States
Duration: Apr 12 2007Apr 15 2007

Other

Other2007 4th IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging: From Nano to Macro; ISBI'07
CountryUnited States
CityArlington, VA
Period4/12/074/15/07

Fingerprint

Electron Microscope Tomography
Viruses
Tomography
Proteins
Virus Assembly
Spatial Analysis
Temperature
Electrons
Cellular Structures
Molecular Structure
Molecular Biology
Microscopy
Electron Microscopy
Light
Cryogenics
Molecular structure
Electron microscopy
Optical microscopy
Membranes
Data acquisition

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Subramaniam, S. (2007). Determination of protein structures in situ: Electron tomography of intact viruses and cells. In 2007 4th IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging: From Nano to Macro - Proceedings (pp. 233-235). [4193265] https://doi.org/10.1109/ISBI.2007.356831

Determination of protein structures in situ : Electron tomography of intact viruses and cells. / Subramaniam, Sriram.

2007 4th IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging: From Nano to Macro - Proceedings. 2007. p. 233-235 4193265.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Subramaniam, S 2007, Determination of protein structures in situ: Electron tomography of intact viruses and cells. in 2007 4th IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging: From Nano to Macro - Proceedings., 4193265, pp. 233-235, 2007 4th IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging: From Nano to Macro; ISBI'07, Arlington, VA, United States, 4/12/07. https://doi.org/10.1109/ISBI.2007.356831
Subramaniam S. Determination of protein structures in situ: Electron tomography of intact viruses and cells. In 2007 4th IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging: From Nano to Macro - Proceedings. 2007. p. 233-235. 4193265 https://doi.org/10.1109/ISBI.2007.356831
Subramaniam, Sriram. / Determination of protein structures in situ : Electron tomography of intact viruses and cells. 2007 4th IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging: From Nano to Macro - Proceedings. 2007. pp. 233-235
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