Determinants of Utilization and Community Experiences with Community Health Volunteers for Treatment of Childhood Illnesses in Rural Sierra Leone

Aisha I. Yansaneh, Asha S. George, Alyssa Sharkey, William R. Brieger, Lawrence H. Moulton, Fatu Yumkella, Peter Bangura, Augustin Kabano, Theresa Diaz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In 2010, at the same time as the national roll out of the Free Health Care Initiative (FHCI), which removed user fees for facility based health care, trained community health volunteers (CHVs) were deployed to provide integrated community case management of diarrhea, malaria and pneumonia to children under 5 years of age (U5) in Kambia and Pujehun districts, Sierra Leone. After 2 years of implementation and in the context of FHCI, CHV utilization rate was 14.0 %. In this study, we examine the factors associated with this level of CHV utilization. A cross-sectional household-cluster survey of 1590 caregivers of 2279 children U5 was conducted in 2012; with CHV utilization assessed using a multiple logistic regression model. Focus groups and in-depth interviews were also conducted to understand communities’ experiences with CHVs. Children with diarrhea (OR = 3.17, 95 % CI: 1.17–8.60), from female-headed households (OR = 4.55, 95 % CI: 1.88–11.00), and whose caregivers reported poor quality of care as a barrier to facility care-seeking (OR = 8.53, 95 % CI: 3.13–23.16) were more likely to receive treatment from a CHV. Despite low utilization, caregivers were highly familiar and appreciative of CHVs, but were concerned about the lack of financial remuneration for CHVs. CHVs remained an important source of care for children from female-headed households and whose caregivers reported poor quality of care at health facilities. CHVs are an important strategy for certain populations even when facility utilization is high or when facility services are compromised, as has happened with the recent Ebola epidemic in Sierra Leone.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)376-386
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Community Health
Volume41
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2016

Keywords

  • Children under five
  • Community health workers/volunteers
  • Integrated community case management
  • Sierra Leone
  • Utilization

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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