Determinants of influenza vaccination in hard-to-reach urban populations

W. K. Bryant, D. C. Ompad, S. Sisco, S. Blaney, K. Glidden, E. Phillips, D. Vlahov, S. Galea

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Objective.: Influenza vaccination rates among disadvantaged minority and hard-to-reach populations are lower than in other groups. We assessed the barriers to influenza vaccination in disadvantaged urban areas. Methods.: We conducted a cross-sectional study, using venue-based sampling, collecting data on residents of eight neighborhoods throughout East Harlem and the Bronx, New York City. Results.: Of 760 total respondents, 461 (61.6%) had received influenza vaccination at some point in their life. In multivariable models, having access to routine medical care, receipt of health or social services, having tested positive for HIV, and current interest in receiving influenza vaccination were significantly associated with having received influenza vaccination in the previous year. Of participants surveyed, 79.6% were interested in receiving an influenza vaccination at the time of survey. Among participants who had never previously received influenza vaccination in the past, 73.4% were interested in being vaccinated; factors significantly associated with an interest in being vaccinated were minority race, lower annual income, history of being homeless, being uninsured/underinsured, and not having access to routine medical care. Conclusions.: Participants who are unconnected to health or social services or government health insurance are less likely to have been vaccinated in the past although these persons are willing to receive vaccine if it were available.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)60-70
    Number of pages11
    JournalPreventive Medicine
    Volume43
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Jul 2006

    Fingerprint

    Urban Population
    Human Influenza
    Vaccination
    Vulnerable Populations
    Social Work
    Health Services
    Health Insurance
    Vaccines
    Cross-Sectional Studies
    HIV
    Population

    Keywords

    • Disadvantaged
    • Hard-to-reach populations
    • Influenza
    • Urban
    • Vaccination

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Medicine(all)

    Cite this

    Bryant, W. K., Ompad, D. C., Sisco, S., Blaney, S., Glidden, K., Phillips, E., ... Galea, S. (2006). Determinants of influenza vaccination in hard-to-reach urban populations. Preventive Medicine, 43(1), 60-70. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ypmed.2006.03.018

    Determinants of influenza vaccination in hard-to-reach urban populations. / Bryant, W. K.; Ompad, D. C.; Sisco, S.; Blaney, S.; Glidden, K.; Phillips, E.; Vlahov, D.; Galea, S.

    In: Preventive Medicine, Vol. 43, No. 1, 07.2006, p. 60-70.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Bryant, WK, Ompad, DC, Sisco, S, Blaney, S, Glidden, K, Phillips, E, Vlahov, D & Galea, S 2006, 'Determinants of influenza vaccination in hard-to-reach urban populations', Preventive Medicine, vol. 43, no. 1, pp. 60-70. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ypmed.2006.03.018
    Bryant WK, Ompad DC, Sisco S, Blaney S, Glidden K, Phillips E et al. Determinants of influenza vaccination in hard-to-reach urban populations. Preventive Medicine. 2006 Jul;43(1):60-70. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ypmed.2006.03.018
    Bryant, W. K. ; Ompad, D. C. ; Sisco, S. ; Blaney, S. ; Glidden, K. ; Phillips, E. ; Vlahov, D. ; Galea, S. / Determinants of influenza vaccination in hard-to-reach urban populations. In: Preventive Medicine. 2006 ; Vol. 43, No. 1. pp. 60-70.
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