Determinants of Campylobacter infection and association with growth and enteric inflammation in children under 2 years of age in low-resource settings

Md Ahshanul Haque, James A. Platts-Mills, Estomih Mduma, Ladaporn Bodhidatta, Pascal Bessong, Sadia Shakoor, Gagandeep Kang, Margaret N. Kosek, Aldo A.M. Lima, Sanjaya K. Shrestha, Md Ashraful Alam, Alexandre Havt, Amidou Samie, Richard L. Guerrant, Dennis Lang, Mustafa Mahfuz, Zulfiqar A. Bhutta, Eric R. Houpt, Tahmeed Ahmed

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Campylobacter species infections have been associated with malnutrition and intestinal inflammation among children in low-resource settings. However, it remains unclear whether that association is specific to Campylobacter jejuni/coli. The aim of this study was to assess the association between both all Campylobacter species infections and Campylobacter jejuni/coli infections on growth and enteric inflammation in children aged 1–24 months. We analyzed data from 1715 children followed from birth until 24 months of age in the MAL-ED birth cohort study, including detection of Campylobacter species by enzyme immunoassay and Campylobacter jejuni/coli by quantitative PCR in stool samples. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) concentration in stool, used as a quantitative index of enteric inflammation, was measured. The incidence rate per 100 child-months of infections with Campylobacter jejuni/coli and Campylobacter species during 1–24 month follow up were 17.7 and 29.6 respectively. Female sex of child, shorter duration of exclusive breastfeeding, lower maternal age, mother having less than 3 living children, maternal educational level of <6 years, lack of routine treatment of drinking water, and unimproved sanitation were associated with Campylobacter jejuni/coli infection. The cumulative burden of both Campylobacter jejuni/coli infections and Campylobacter species were associated with poor growth and increased intestinal inflammation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number17124
JournalScientific reports
Volume9
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2019

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

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