Detection of rotaviruses in the day care environment by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction

James Wilde, Rory Van, Larry Pickering, Joseph Eiden, Robert Yolken

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Group A rotavirus is an important cause of morbidity among infants and toddlers in day care centers. Transmission by the fecal-oral route is well established, but fomites and environmental surfaces may also play an important role in transmission. A highly sensitive polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was used to detect rotavirus RNA in day care environments. Areas sampled included floors, diaper change areas, toy balls, and other surfaces. In two centers undergoing outbreaks of rotavirus, 7 (39%) of 18 toy balls had detectable rotavirus as did 8 (21 %) of 39 swabs from environmental surfaces. By comparison, only 1 (5%) of 21 toy balls and 1 (2%) of 44 environmental surface swabs had detectable rotavirus in centers without rotavirus outbreaks (P =.0001). Thus, rotaviruses are highly prevalent in day care centers during outbreaks of diarrhea. The monitoring of environments by sensitive nucleic acid amplification techniques may lead to strategies for the diminution of disease transmission within the day care environment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)507-511
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
Volume166
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1992

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Infectious Diseases

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Detection of rotaviruses in the day care environment by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this