Detection of Chlamydia trachomatis by the Gen-Probe AMPLIFIED Chlamydia Trachomatis Assay (AMP CT) in urine specimens from men and women and endocervical specimens from women

Kimberly A. Crotchfelt, Barbara Pare, Charlotte Gaydos, Thomas C. Quinn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Molecular biology-based amplification methods are significantly more sensitive than other methods for the detection of Chlamydia trachomatis. The performance characteristics of the new Gen-Probe AMPLIFIED Chlamydia Trachomatis Assay (AMP CT) with endocervical and urine specimens were compared to those of culture for patients attending two Baltimore City sexually transmitted disease clinics and a clinic for adolescents. AMP CT uses transcription-mediated amplification (TMA) and hybridization protection assay procedures to qualitatively detect C. trachomatis by targeting a 23S rRNA. Discrepant results between culture-negative and AMP CT-positive specimens were resolved by direct fluorescent-antibody staining of sedimented culture transport medium for elementary bodies and by TMA with 16S rRNA as a target. Following discrepant analysis, for 480 female urine specimens AMP CT had a sensitivity of 93.8% and a specificity of 100%. For 464 male urine specimens, the resolved sensitivity and specificity of AMP CT were 95.6 and 98.7%, respectively. For the 479 endocervical swab specimens the sensitivity of AMP CT was 100% and the specificity was 99.5%. Resolved culture sensitivities of AMP CT for female and male swab specimens were 52.3 and 58.9%, respectively. These results demonstrate that AMP CT is highly sensitive for the detection of C. trachomatis in endocervical specimens and in urine specimens from men and women.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)391-394
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of clinical microbiology
Volume36
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1998

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)

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