Detection of atherosclerosis using a novel positron-sensitive probe and 18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)

R. J. Lederman, R. R. Raylman, S. J. Fisher, P. V. Kison, H. San, E. G. Nabel, R. L. Wahl

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Inflammation contributes to atherosclerotic plaque remodeling, enlargement and rupture. Non-invasive imaging of coronary artery inflammation could help target therapy to 'vulnerable' atheromata, but is limited because of small tissue mass and arterial motion. Local radiopharmaceutical imaging may overcome some of these limitations. We used a positron-sensitive fiberoptic probe, which can distinguish positron emissions from annihilation photons, to identify diseased from healthy endothelium in an atherosclerotic model. New Zealand White rabbits underwent Fogarty-catheter injury of an iliac artery and then were fed a high-fat diet for 3 weeks. Fasted animals received 90-180 MBq of 18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) 2-4 h before sacrifice and harvest of injured and uninjured iliacs. Arteries were incised longitudinally and the probe was placed in contact with the arterial intima. Multiple measurements were obtained along 1 cm artery segments in 60 s intervals, and corrected for 18F decay and background. Measurements were recorded over 93 injured and normal artery segments in 11 animals. Mean probe Z-scores were 4.8-fold higher (CI 3.4-6.3) over injury atherosclerosis compared with uninjured normal iliac artery segments (P

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)747-753
Number of pages7
JournalNuclear Medicine Communications
Volume22
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Atherosclerosis
Arteries
Iliac Artery
Atherosclerotic Plaques
Electrons
Tunica Intima
Inflammation
Radiopharmaceuticals
Wounds and Injuries
High Fat Diet
Photons
Endothelium
Rupture
Coronary Vessels
Catheters
Rabbits
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Atherosclerosis
  • Fludeoxyglucose F18
  • Inflammation
  • Positron
  • Radionuclide imaging

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology

Cite this

Lederman, R. J., Raylman, R. R., Fisher, S. J., Kison, P. V., San, H., Nabel, E. G., & Wahl, R. L. (2001). Detection of atherosclerosis using a novel positron-sensitive probe and 18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG). Nuclear Medicine Communications, 22(7), 747-753. https://doi.org/10.1097/00006231-200107000-00004

Detection of atherosclerosis using a novel positron-sensitive probe and 18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG). / Lederman, R. J.; Raylman, R. R.; Fisher, S. J.; Kison, P. V.; San, H.; Nabel, E. G.; Wahl, R. L.

In: Nuclear Medicine Communications, Vol. 22, No. 7, 2001, p. 747-753.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lederman, RJ, Raylman, RR, Fisher, SJ, Kison, PV, San, H, Nabel, EG & Wahl, RL 2001, 'Detection of atherosclerosis using a novel positron-sensitive probe and 18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)', Nuclear Medicine Communications, vol. 22, no. 7, pp. 747-753. https://doi.org/10.1097/00006231-200107000-00004
Lederman, R. J. ; Raylman, R. R. ; Fisher, S. J. ; Kison, P. V. ; San, H. ; Nabel, E. G. ; Wahl, R. L. / Detection of atherosclerosis using a novel positron-sensitive probe and 18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG). In: Nuclear Medicine Communications. 2001 ; Vol. 22, No. 7. pp. 747-753.
@article{b86c2a5cd47a44afbf1c620b6db3150e,
title = "Detection of atherosclerosis using a novel positron-sensitive probe and 18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)",
abstract = "Inflammation contributes to atherosclerotic plaque remodeling, enlargement and rupture. Non-invasive imaging of coronary artery inflammation could help target therapy to 'vulnerable' atheromata, but is limited because of small tissue mass and arterial motion. Local radiopharmaceutical imaging may overcome some of these limitations. We used a positron-sensitive fiberoptic probe, which can distinguish positron emissions from annihilation photons, to identify diseased from healthy endothelium in an atherosclerotic model. New Zealand White rabbits underwent Fogarty-catheter injury of an iliac artery and then were fed a high-fat diet for 3 weeks. Fasted animals received 90-180 MBq of 18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) 2-4 h before sacrifice and harvest of injured and uninjured iliacs. Arteries were incised longitudinally and the probe was placed in contact with the arterial intima. Multiple measurements were obtained along 1 cm artery segments in 60 s intervals, and corrected for 18F decay and background. Measurements were recorded over 93 injured and normal artery segments in 11 animals. Mean probe Z-scores were 4.8-fold higher (CI 3.4-6.3) over injury atherosclerosis compared with uninjured normal iliac artery segments (P",
keywords = "Atherosclerosis, Fludeoxyglucose F18, Inflammation, Positron, Radionuclide imaging",
author = "Lederman, {R. J.} and Raylman, {R. R.} and Fisher, {S. J.} and Kison, {P. V.} and H. San and Nabel, {E. G.} and Wahl, {R. L.}",
year = "2001",
doi = "10.1097/00006231-200107000-00004",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "22",
pages = "747--753",
journal = "Nuclear Medicine Communications",
issn = "0143-3636",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "7",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Detection of atherosclerosis using a novel positron-sensitive probe and 18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)

AU - Lederman, R. J.

AU - Raylman, R. R.

AU - Fisher, S. J.

AU - Kison, P. V.

AU - San, H.

AU - Nabel, E. G.

AU - Wahl, R. L.

PY - 2001

Y1 - 2001

N2 - Inflammation contributes to atherosclerotic plaque remodeling, enlargement and rupture. Non-invasive imaging of coronary artery inflammation could help target therapy to 'vulnerable' atheromata, but is limited because of small tissue mass and arterial motion. Local radiopharmaceutical imaging may overcome some of these limitations. We used a positron-sensitive fiberoptic probe, which can distinguish positron emissions from annihilation photons, to identify diseased from healthy endothelium in an atherosclerotic model. New Zealand White rabbits underwent Fogarty-catheter injury of an iliac artery and then were fed a high-fat diet for 3 weeks. Fasted animals received 90-180 MBq of 18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) 2-4 h before sacrifice and harvest of injured and uninjured iliacs. Arteries were incised longitudinally and the probe was placed in contact with the arterial intima. Multiple measurements were obtained along 1 cm artery segments in 60 s intervals, and corrected for 18F decay and background. Measurements were recorded over 93 injured and normal artery segments in 11 animals. Mean probe Z-scores were 4.8-fold higher (CI 3.4-6.3) over injury atherosclerosis compared with uninjured normal iliac artery segments (P

AB - Inflammation contributes to atherosclerotic plaque remodeling, enlargement and rupture. Non-invasive imaging of coronary artery inflammation could help target therapy to 'vulnerable' atheromata, but is limited because of small tissue mass and arterial motion. Local radiopharmaceutical imaging may overcome some of these limitations. We used a positron-sensitive fiberoptic probe, which can distinguish positron emissions from annihilation photons, to identify diseased from healthy endothelium in an atherosclerotic model. New Zealand White rabbits underwent Fogarty-catheter injury of an iliac artery and then were fed a high-fat diet for 3 weeks. Fasted animals received 90-180 MBq of 18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) 2-4 h before sacrifice and harvest of injured and uninjured iliacs. Arteries were incised longitudinally and the probe was placed in contact with the arterial intima. Multiple measurements were obtained along 1 cm artery segments in 60 s intervals, and corrected for 18F decay and background. Measurements were recorded over 93 injured and normal artery segments in 11 animals. Mean probe Z-scores were 4.8-fold higher (CI 3.4-6.3) over injury atherosclerosis compared with uninjured normal iliac artery segments (P

KW - Atherosclerosis

KW - Fludeoxyglucose F18

KW - Inflammation

KW - Positron

KW - Radionuclide imaging

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0034952536&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0034952536&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/00006231-200107000-00004

DO - 10.1097/00006231-200107000-00004

M3 - Article

C2 - 11453046

AN - SCOPUS:0034952536

VL - 22

SP - 747

EP - 753

JO - Nuclear Medicine Communications

JF - Nuclear Medicine Communications

SN - 0143-3636

IS - 7

ER -