Despite limitations in content range, the SCIM-III is reproducible and a valid indicator of physical function in youths with spinal cord injury and dysfunction

M. J. Mulcahey, Christina Calhoun Thielen, Cristina Sadowsky, Jennifer L. Silvestri, Rebecca Martin, Lauren White, Julie A. Cagney, Lawrence C. Vogel, Jennifer Schottler, Loren Davidson, Ingrid Parry, Heather B. Taylor, Kristine Higgins, Michelle L. Feltz, Rebecca Sinko, Jackie Bultman, Jenny Mazurkiewicz, John Gaughan

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Abstract

Study design: Multi-center, repeated measures Objectives: Evaluate psychometric properties of the SCIM-III in children. Setting: Seven facilities in North America Methods: One-hundred and twenty-seven youths, mean age of 10.8 years and chronic spinal cord injury/dysfunction completed two administrations of the Spinal Cord Independence Measure-III (SCIM-III). Mean, standard deviation, range values were calculated for SCIM-III total and subscales for the entire sample, four age groups and injury characteristics. Test-retest reliability, concurrent validity, and floor and ceiling effects were examined. Results: Total SCIM-III and self-care (SC) subscale scores for the youngest age group were lower than those for the three older age groups. There were statistically significant differences in SC subscale scores between neurological level (NL) C5-T1 and T2-T12; C5-T1 and L1-S4/5; and T2-T12 and L1-S4/5 and in in-room, and indoor/outdoor mobility subscale scores between C1-C4 and T2-T12; C1-C4 and L1-S4/5; C5-T1 and T2-T12; C5-T1 and L1-S4/5; and T2-T12 and L1-S4/5. All scores between motor complete and motor incomplete differed. Test-retest reliability was good (ICC values = > 0.84) and there was moderate to strong correlation between SCIM-III and the FIM® Instrument (r = 0.77-0.92). Ceiling effects were present in the SC subscale for the oldest age group (24%) and for NL L1-S4/5 (35.5%) and in in-room mobility subscale for 6-12 (45.7%), 13-15 (30.43%) and 16-17 (60%) ages, paraplegia (42.4%), tetraplegia (37.1%), incomplete injuries (50%), and T2-T12 (38%) and L1-S4/5 (100%) NL. Conclusion: Despite limitations in content range, the SCIM-III is reproducible, and a valid indicator of physical functioning in youth with SCI/D 6 years of age and older. Sponsorship: The study was funded by the Craig H. Neilsen Foundation, Spinal Cord Injury Research on the Translation Spectrum, Senior Research Award Grant #282592 (Mulcahey, PI)

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)332-340
Number of pages9
JournalSpinal Cord
Volume56
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2018

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

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    Mulcahey, M. J., Thielen, C. C., Sadowsky, C., Silvestri, J. L., Martin, R., White, L., Cagney, J. A., Vogel, L. C., Schottler, J., Davidson, L., Parry, I., Taylor, H. B., Higgins, K., Feltz, M. L., Sinko, R., Bultman, J., Mazurkiewicz, J., & Gaughan, J. (2018). Despite limitations in content range, the SCIM-III is reproducible and a valid indicator of physical function in youths with spinal cord injury and dysfunction. Spinal Cord, 56(4), 332-340. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41393-017-0036-0