Desirability of Personalized Guns Among Current Gun Owners

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Introduction: Personalized guns are touted as a technology that could substantially reduce firearm-related deaths. However, limited research has examined the desirability of personalized guns among current gun owners or the factors influencing the likelihood of purchase if personalized guns were available. Methods: A nationally representative online survey of U.S. gun owners was conducted in 2016 to examine their knowledge and perceived likelihood of purchasing a personalized gun and concerns regarding the technology and cost. Analyses were conducted in 2018. Descriptive statistics were generated, and logistic regression models were used to determine which characteristics were associated with respondents who reported being likely to purchase a personalized gun. Results: Among current gun owners, 48% had heard of personalized guns, and 79% thought licensed dealers should sell both traditional and personalized guns. Only 5% reported that they were very likely, and 13% were somewhat likely, to purchase a personalized gun with radio frequency identification technology that added $300 to the price. A total of 70% reported concerns about whether the technology would work when needed, and 56% reported concerns about price. Respondents who reported safe storage practices for all their guns had a 50% higher likelihood of being a likely purchaser (AOR=1.50, 95% CI=1.05, 2.14). Respondents whose storage practices were influenced by a gun safety training course had a 52% higher likelihood of being a likely purchaser (AOR=1.52, 95% CI=1.06, 2.19). Conclusions: Current gun owners expressed modest interest in purchasing personalized guns with radio frequency identification technology. Because gun owners interested in personalized guns appear more safety conscious, the potential benefit of personalized guns in these homes may be limited.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)191-196
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican journal of preventive medicine
Volume57
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2019

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Firearms
Technology
Radio Frequency Identification Device
Logistic Models
Safety

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Desirability of Personalized Guns Among Current Gun Owners. / Crifasi, Cassandra; O'Dwyer, Jayne K.; McGinty, Emma Beth; Webster, Daniel W; Barry, Colleen L.

In: American journal of preventive medicine, Vol. 57, No. 2, 01.08.2019, p. 191-196.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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