Designing keybindings to be easy to learn and resistant to forgetting even when the set of commands is large

Neff Walker, Judith Reitman Olson

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

We formulated a set of rules for producing key-commands that are alternatives for activating commands with a mouse from a menu. Because software is getting increasingly complex, it was important that the rules cover a wide variety of commands. The rules combined verb-modifier-object order and mnemonic abbreviations for the words in each slot. Our keybindings were shown not only to cover a wide set, but to be far easier to learn than EMACs (a common keybinding set) and a more robust form with respect to negative interference from prior and post-learning of another set.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI 1988
EditorsJ.J. O'Hare
PublisherAssociation for Computing Machinery
Pages201-206
Number of pages6
ISBN (Electronic)0201142376
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 1988
Externally publishedYes
Event1988 SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI 1988 - Washington, United States
Duration: May 15 1988May 19 1988

Publication series

NameConference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings
VolumePart F130202

Other

Other1988 SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI 1988
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CityWashington
Period5/15/885/19/88

Keywords

  • Command language design
  • EMACs
  • Keybindings
  • Transfer of training

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Software
  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Computer Graphics and Computer-Aided Design

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