Designing an individually tailored multilevel intervention to increase engagement in hiv and substance use treatment among people who inject drugs with hiv: Hptn 074

Kathryn E. Lancaster, William C. Miller, Tetiana Kiriazova, Riza Sarasvita, Quynh Bui, Tran Viet Ha, Kostyantyn Dumchev, Hepa Susami, Erica L. Hamilton, Scott Rose, Rebecca B. Hershow, Vivian F. Go, David Metzger, Irving F. Hoffman, Carl A. Latkin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

People who inject drugs (PWID) face barriers to engagement in antiretroviral treatment (ART) and medication-assisted treatment (MAT). We detail the design, rapid preparation and adaptation, and systematic implementation of a flexible, individually tailored intervention for PWID in multiple settings: Indonesia, Ukraine, and Vietnam. HPTN 074 integrated systems navigation and counseling to facilitate entry and adherence to ART and MAT. Site-level guidance on the intervention involved in-depth interviews (IDIs) among PWID and their supporters and site-specific document review. IDIs emphasized ART misinformation and importance of social support for adherence. The document review revealed differences in health care system barriers, requiring an intervention that was flexible and tailored enough to address key outcomes. Implementation included regular debriefs for iterative adaptations based on participants’ needs, including booster counseling sessions and subsidizing pre-ART testing. HPTN 074 provides a unique framework implementing a flexible and scalable intervention to improve ART and MAT outcomes among PWID across multiple settings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)95-110
Number of pages16
JournalAIDS Education and Prevention
Volume31
Issue number2
StatePublished - Apr 2019

Keywords

  • ART
  • HIV
  • Injection drug use
  • Medication-assisted treatment
  • Substance use

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

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