Design and Deployment of a Pediatric Cardiac Arrest Surveillance System

Jordan Duval-Arnould, Heather Marie Newton, Leann McNamara, Branden Michael Engorn, Kareen Jones, Meghan Bernier, Pamela Dodge, Cheryl Salamone, Utpal Bhalala, Justin Jeffers, Lilly Engineer, Marie Diener-West, Elizabeth Hunt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective. We aimed to increase detection of pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) events and collection of physiologic and performance data for use in quality improvement (QI) efforts. Materials and Methods. We developed a workflow-driven surveillance system that leveraged organizational information technology systems to trigger CPR detection and analysis processes. We characterized detection by notification source, type, location, and year, and compared it to previous methods of detection. Results. From 1/1/2013 through 12/31/2015, there were 2,986 unique notifications associated with 2,145 events, 317 requiring CPR. PICU and PEDS-ED accounted for 65% of CPR events, whereas floor care areas were responsible for only 3% of events. 100% of PEDS-OR and >70% of PICU CPR events would not have been included in QI efforts. Performance data from both defibrillator and bedside monitor increased annually. (2013: 1%; 2014: 18%; 2015: 27%). Discussion. After deployment of this system, detection has increased ∼9-fold and performance data collection increased annually. Had the system not been deployed, 100% of PEDS-OR and 50-70% of PICU, NICU, and PEDS-ED events would have been missed. Conclusion. By leveraging hospital information technology and medical device data, identification of pediatric cardiac arrest with an associated increased capture in the proportion of objective performance data is possible.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number9187962
JournalCritical Care Research and Practice
Volume2018
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018

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Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation
Heart Arrest
Pediatrics
Quality Improvement
Technology
Defibrillators
Workflow
Information Systems
Equipment and Supplies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

Cite this

Design and Deployment of a Pediatric Cardiac Arrest Surveillance System. / Duval-Arnould, Jordan; Newton, Heather Marie; McNamara, Leann; Engorn, Branden Michael; Jones, Kareen; Bernier, Meghan; Dodge, Pamela; Salamone, Cheryl; Bhalala, Utpal; Jeffers, Justin; Engineer, Lilly; Diener-West, Marie; Hunt, Elizabeth.

In: Critical Care Research and Practice, Vol. 2018, 9187962, 01.01.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Duval-Arnould, Jordan ; Newton, Heather Marie ; McNamara, Leann ; Engorn, Branden Michael ; Jones, Kareen ; Bernier, Meghan ; Dodge, Pamela ; Salamone, Cheryl ; Bhalala, Utpal ; Jeffers, Justin ; Engineer, Lilly ; Diener-West, Marie ; Hunt, Elizabeth. / Design and Deployment of a Pediatric Cardiac Arrest Surveillance System. In: Critical Care Research and Practice. 2018 ; Vol. 2018.
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