Description of an influenza vaccination campaign and use of a randomized survey to determine participation rates

Xu Guang Tao, Janine Giampino, Deborah A. Dooley, Frances E. Humphrey, David M. Baron, Edward J. Bernacki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

OBJECTIVES. To describe the procedures used during an influenza immunization program and the use of a randomized survey to quantify the vaccination rate among healthcare workers with and without patient contact. DESIGN. Influenza immunization vaccination program and a randomized survey. SETTING. Johns Hopkins University and Health System. METHODS. The 2008/2009 Johns Hopkins Influenza Immunization Program was administered to 40,000 employees, including 10,763 healthcare workers. A 10% randomized sample (1,084) of individuals were interviewed to evaluate the vaccination rate among healthcare workers with direct patient contact. RESULTS. Between September 23, 2008, and April 30, 2009, a total of 16,079 vaccinations were administered. Ninety-four percent (94.5%) of persons who were vaccinated received the vaccine in the first 7 weeks of the campaign. The randomized survey demonstrated an overall vaccination rate of 71.3% (95% confidence interval, 68.6%-74.0%) and a vaccination rate for employees with direct patient contact of 82.8% (95% confidence interval, 80.1%-85.5%). The main reason (25.3%) for declining the program vaccine was because the employee had received documented vaccination elsewhere. CONCLUSIONS. The methods used to increase participation in the recent immunization program were successful, and a randomized survey to assess participation was found to be an efficient means of evaluating the workforce's level of potential immunity to the influenza virus.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)151-157
Number of pages7
JournalInfection Control and Hospital Epidemiology
Volume31
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2010

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Immunization Programs
Human Influenza
Vaccination
Delivery of Health Care
Vaccines
Confidence Intervals
Surveys and Questionnaires
Orthomyxoviridae
Immunity
Health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Epidemiology
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Description of an influenza vaccination campaign and use of a randomized survey to determine participation rates. / Tao, Xu Guang; Giampino, Janine; Dooley, Deborah A.; Humphrey, Frances E.; Baron, David M.; Bernacki, Edward J.

In: Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology, Vol. 31, No. 2, 02.2010, p. 151-157.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tao, Xu Guang ; Giampino, Janine ; Dooley, Deborah A. ; Humphrey, Frances E. ; Baron, David M. ; Bernacki, Edward J. / Description of an influenza vaccination campaign and use of a randomized survey to determine participation rates. In: Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology. 2010 ; Vol. 31, No. 2. pp. 151-157.
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