Depressive symptoms, physical inactivity and risk of cardiovascular mortality in older adults: The Cardiovascular Health Study

Sithu Win, Kapil Parakh, Chete M. Eze-Nliam, John S. Gottdiener, Willem J. Kop, Roy Ziegelstein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Depressed older individuals have a higher mortality than older persons without depression. Depression is associated with physical inactivity, and low levels of physical activity have been shown in some cohorts to be a partial mediator of the relationship between depression and cardiovascular events and mortality. Methods: A cohort of 5888 individuals (mean 72.8±5.6 years, 58% female, 16% African-American) from four US communities was followed for an average of 10.3 years. Self-reported depressive symptoms (10-item Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale) were assessed annually and self-reported physical activity was assessed at baseline and at 3 and 7 years. To estimate how much of the increased risk of cardiovascular mortality associated with depressive symptoms was due to physical inactivity, Cox regression with time-varying covariates was used to determine the percentage change in the log HR of depressive symptoms for cardiovascular mortality after adding physical activity variables. Results: At baseline, 20% of participants scored above the cut-off for depressive symptoms. There were 2915 deaths (49.8%), of which 1176 (20.1%) were from cardiovascular causes. Depressive symptoms and physical inactivity each independently increased the risk of cardiovascular mortality and were strongly associated with each other (all p

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)500-505
Number of pages6
JournalHeart
Volume97
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2011

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Depression
Mortality
Health
Exercise
African Americans
Epidemiologic Studies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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Depressive symptoms, physical inactivity and risk of cardiovascular mortality in older adults : The Cardiovascular Health Study. / Win, Sithu; Parakh, Kapil; Eze-Nliam, Chete M.; Gottdiener, John S.; Kop, Willem J.; Ziegelstein, Roy.

In: Heart, Vol. 97, No. 6, 03.2011, p. 500-505.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Win, Sithu ; Parakh, Kapil ; Eze-Nliam, Chete M. ; Gottdiener, John S. ; Kop, Willem J. ; Ziegelstein, Roy. / Depressive symptoms, physical inactivity and risk of cardiovascular mortality in older adults : The Cardiovascular Health Study. In: Heart. 2011 ; Vol. 97, No. 6. pp. 500-505.
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