Depressive symptoms of Whites and African Americans aged 60 years and older

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Consistent with prior work, our hypothesis was that oiler African Americans are less likely to report dysphoria than are older Whites. Study subjects were 968 participants aged 60 years and oiler in Baltimore, Maryland, and 1,486 participants aged 60 years and oiler in the Durham- Piedmont region of North Carolina who identified themselves as African American or White and who had complete data on symptoms of depression active in the one month prior to interview, as well as several covariates thought to be related to depression. The effect of self-reported race on the endorsement of symptoms from the section on Major Depression in the Diagnostic Interview Schedule was estimated employing structural equations with a measurement model. Older African Americans were less likely to report dysphoria than oiler Whites, although this only achieved statistical significance by conventional standards at the Durham-Piedmont site. Oiler African Americans at both sites were significantly more likely to report thoughts of death.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)P277-P286
JournalJournals of Gerontology - Series B Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences
Volume53
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1998

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

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