Depressive symptoms and risk factors for HIV acquisition among black women attending urban health centers in Baltimore

S. T. Orr, D. D. Celentano, J. Santelli, L. Burwell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Blacks comprise 55% of all AIDS cases among women, and have 9 times the risk of white women of mortality from AIDS. Thus, prevention of HIV infection is critical among black women. Programs to prevent HIV infection have focused upon the adoption of behavioral strategies such as limiting the number of sexual partners, avoiding intercourse with IV drug users, and using condoms. However, such programs are dependent upon the ability of the woman to assume responsibility for her health and successfully adopt behavior changes. Generally overlooked in the development of health education interventions are those factors, such as depressive symptoms, which may make it very difficult for an individual to adopt healthy behaviors. In the present study, an analysis was conducted of the association between depressive symptoms and risk factors for the acquisition of HIV infection among black women using two urban health centers. Those women with higher levels of depressive symptoms were significantly more likely than other women to report more risk factors for HIV acquisition. The implications of these findings for the development of preventive interventions are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)230-236
Number of pages7
JournalAIDS Education and Prevention
Volume6
Issue number3
StatePublished - Jan 1 1994

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

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