Depression as an antecedent of frequency of intravenous drug use in an urban, nontreatment sample

Carl A. Latkin, Wallace Mandell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The present study examined the relationship between depressive symptoms and frequency of drug use in 91 low income nontreatment intravenous drug users in Baltimore, Maryland. The majority of participants were injecting both heroin and cocaine. Scores on the depression scale at both waves were correlated with frequency of injection at wave two. Depression at wave one had a higher correlation with frequency of injections at wave two than did concurrent depression at wave two. Even after accounting for several confounds between depression and frequency of injection, depression at wave one remained highly correlated with frequency of injection at wave two.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1601-1612
Number of pages12
JournalSubstance Use and Misuse
Volume28
Issue number14
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1993

Keywords

  • AIDS
  • Depression
  • Drug misuse
  • Human immunodeficiency virus
  • Intravenous drugs

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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