Depression and social context: Primary supporter relationship factors associated with depressive symptoms among a disadvantaged population with HIV/AIDS

Amy R. Knowlton, Aaron Curry, Wei Hua, Lawrence Wissow

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Social support is associated with better health outcomes among chronically ill individuals, yet support receipt can be stressful. The study examined supporter relationship factors, among n=156 main-supporter- HIV+support-recipient dyads, associated with recipient's depression (CES-D≥16). Results indicated that support recipient's depression was associated with a 3.6-times higher odds of main supporters' depression, a 2.5-times higher odds of supporters' being a friend or same-generatin kin (versus partner or other kin), and a 3.7-times higher odds of support recipients' financial reliance on the supporter. Support recipients' depression was positively associated with supporter-recipient conflict, and negatively associated with supporter-recipient communication. The model explained over half the deviance in recipients' depressive symptoms. Results suggest prevention interventions ought to target HIV seropositives and their main supporters and promote communication and conflict resolution skills. Such intervention approaches may alleviate their depression and promote sustained HIV-related support, with potential implications to HIV treatment outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)526-541
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of community psychology
Volume37
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2009

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology

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