Depression Among Latinos in the United States: A Meta-Analytic Review

Tamar Mendelson, David H. Rehkopf, Laura D. Kubzansky

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The authors conducted a meta-analytic review to assess the prevalence of major depressive disorder and depressive symptoms among Latinos compared with non-Latino Whites in the United States using community-based data. Random-effects estimates were calculated for 8 studies meeting inclusion criteria that reported lifetime prevalence of major depressive disorder (combined N = 76,270) and for 23 studies meeting inclusion criteria that reported current prevalence of depressive symptoms (combined N = 38,997). Findings did not indicate a group difference in lifetime prevalence of major depressive disorder (odds ratio = 0.89, 95% confidence interval = 0.72, 1.10). Latinos reported more depressive symptoms than non-Latino Whites (standardized mean difference = 0.19, 95% confidence interval = 0.12, 0.25); however, this effect was small and does not appear to suggest a clinically meaningful preponderance of depressive symptoms among Latinos. Findings are examined in the context of theories on vulnerability and resilience, and recommendations for future research are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)355-366
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology
Volume76
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2008
Externally publishedYes

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Keywords

  • Latinos
  • depressive symptoms
  • major depressive disorder
  • meta-analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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