Deployment of an mHealth patient monitoring solution for diabetes-improved glucose monitoring leads to reduction in medical expenditure

Jonathan C. Javitt, C. Shane Reese, Michael K. Derrick

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Although there is ample evidence that improved glucose control prevents long-term complications of diabetes, few reports have addressed the effect of improved control on short-term healthcare costs. Methods: A mobile health (mHealth)-enabled glucose meter combined with a disease management call center was deployed in 143 employees as part of an employer-sponsored diabetes disease management intervention. The program cost was approximately $50 per member per month over and above the cost of standard care. Results: Overall, on an intention-to-treat basis, this program was associated with an annual reduction of $1,595 (95% confidence interval [CI] -$2,827 to +$181) per person in incurred medical claims. A subanalysis documented that those who actively participated in the program (50 %) incurred a year-over-year claims cost decrease of $3,384 (95 % CI $643 to $5,149) compared with an increase of $282 among those who did not participate. Conclusions: These findings suggest that even partial improvement of diabetes testing adherence within an employed population may result in substantial attenuation of employee medical expense. The reduction in healthcare costs, even when considering those who did not comply, outweighed the program costs by several-fold.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)119-123
Number of pages5
JournalUS Endocrinology
Volume9
Issue number2
StatePublished - 2013

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Telemedicine
Physiologic Monitoring
Health Expenditures
Costs and Cost Analysis
Glucose
Disease Management
Health Care Costs
Confidence Intervals
Diabetes Complications
Standard of Care
Population

Keywords

  • Cost-effectiveness
  • Diabetes
  • Economics
  • Glucose monitoring
  • Wireless-health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Deployment of an mHealth patient monitoring solution for diabetes-improved glucose monitoring leads to reduction in medical expenditure. / Javitt, Jonathan C.; Reese, C. Shane; Derrick, Michael K.

In: US Endocrinology, Vol. 9, No. 2, 2013, p. 119-123.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Javitt, Jonathan C. ; Reese, C. Shane ; Derrick, Michael K. / Deployment of an mHealth patient monitoring solution for diabetes-improved glucose monitoring leads to reduction in medical expenditure. In: US Endocrinology. 2013 ; Vol. 9, No. 2. pp. 119-123.
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