Dental microwear texture analysis shows within-species diet variability in fossil hominins

Robert S. Scott, Peter S. Ungar, Torbjorn S. Bergstrom, Christopher A. Brown, Frederick E. Grine, Mark F. Teaford, Alan Walker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Reconstructing the diets of extinct hominins is essential to understanding the paleobiology and evolutionary history of our lineage. Dental microwear, the study of microscopic tooth-wear resulting from use, provides direct evidence of what an individual ate in the past. Unfortunately, established methods of studying microwear are plagued with low repeatability and high observer error. Here we apply an objective, repeatable approach for studying three-dimensional microwear surface texture to extinct South African hominins. Scanning confocal microscopy together with scale-sensitive fractal analysis are used to characterize the complexity and anisotropy of microwear. Results for living primates show that this approach can distinguish among diets characterized by different fracture properties. When applied to hominins, microwear texture analysis indicates that Australopithecus africanus microwear is more anisotropic, but also more variable in anisotropy than Paranthropus robustus. This latter species has more complex microwear textures, but is also more variable in complexity than A. africanus. This suggests that A. africanus ate more tough foods and P. robustus consumed more hard and brittle items, but that both had variable and overlapping diets.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)693-695
Number of pages3
JournalNature
Volume436
Issue number7051
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 4 2005

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

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