Dendritic morphology of callosal and ipsilateral projection neurons in monkey prefrontal cortex

A. S. Soloway, Michele L Pucak, D. S. Melchitzky, D. A. Lewis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Subpopulations of cortical pyramidal neurons have been distinguished based on the projection target of their principal axons or by their dendritic morphology. In this study, we sought to test the hypothesis that pyramidal neurons in monkey prefrontal cortex that furnish callosal or ipsilateral projections have distinctive dendritic morphologies. Retrogradely-labeled, Fast Blue-containing callosal and ipsilateral neurons were intracellularly filled with Lucifer Yellow, immunoconverted, and reconstructed. Quantitative measurements of the size and complexity of the dendritic arbor, including total dendritic length, horizontal extent, number of branch points, maximum branch order, and number of segments, as well as spine density, were made. In general, callosal neurons had larger and more complex dendritic arbors for both apical and basilar dendritic trees than did ipsilateral neurons. The greatest difference was in total dendritic length; the apical and basilar trees of callosal neurons were 34 and 25% longer, respectively. In addition, spine density was also significantly greater on the apical and basilar dendrites of callosal neurons. These findings could not be explained by differences in somal size or completeness of dendritic filling between callosal and ipsilateral neurons. Our observations support the hypothesis that callosal and ipsilateral neurons differ on a number of measures of dendritic size and complexity. Furthermore, these findings imply that these two subpopulations of pyramidal cells differ in the number and perhaps types of excitatory inputs that they receive. Finally, differences in the dendritic morphology of callosal and ipsilateral neurons have implications for understanding the functional attributes of these two populations of cells, as well as for the characterization of pyramidal neurons in human disease states.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)461-471
Number of pages11
JournalNeuroscience
Volume109
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 14 2002
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Corpus Callosum
Prefrontal Cortex
Haplorhini
Neurons
Pyramidal Cells
Spine
Dendrites
Axons

Keywords

  • Dendrite
  • Dendritic spine
  • Intracellular filling
  • Neuronal reconstruction
  • Pyramidal neuron

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Dendritic morphology of callosal and ipsilateral projection neurons in monkey prefrontal cortex. / Soloway, A. S.; Pucak, Michele L; Melchitzky, D. S.; Lewis, D. A.

In: Neuroscience, Vol. 109, No. 3, 14.02.2002, p. 461-471.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Soloway, A. S. ; Pucak, Michele L ; Melchitzky, D. S. ; Lewis, D. A. / Dendritic morphology of callosal and ipsilateral projection neurons in monkey prefrontal cortex. In: Neuroscience. 2002 ; Vol. 109, No. 3. pp. 461-471.
@article{a61691861049442e97d339cf35779a2e,
title = "Dendritic morphology of callosal and ipsilateral projection neurons in monkey prefrontal cortex",
abstract = "Subpopulations of cortical pyramidal neurons have been distinguished based on the projection target of their principal axons or by their dendritic morphology. In this study, we sought to test the hypothesis that pyramidal neurons in monkey prefrontal cortex that furnish callosal or ipsilateral projections have distinctive dendritic morphologies. Retrogradely-labeled, Fast Blue-containing callosal and ipsilateral neurons were intracellularly filled with Lucifer Yellow, immunoconverted, and reconstructed. Quantitative measurements of the size and complexity of the dendritic arbor, including total dendritic length, horizontal extent, number of branch points, maximum branch order, and number of segments, as well as spine density, were made. In general, callosal neurons had larger and more complex dendritic arbors for both apical and basilar dendritic trees than did ipsilateral neurons. The greatest difference was in total dendritic length; the apical and basilar trees of callosal neurons were 34 and 25{\%} longer, respectively. In addition, spine density was also significantly greater on the apical and basilar dendrites of callosal neurons. These findings could not be explained by differences in somal size or completeness of dendritic filling between callosal and ipsilateral neurons. Our observations support the hypothesis that callosal and ipsilateral neurons differ on a number of measures of dendritic size and complexity. Furthermore, these findings imply that these two subpopulations of pyramidal cells differ in the number and perhaps types of excitatory inputs that they receive. Finally, differences in the dendritic morphology of callosal and ipsilateral neurons have implications for understanding the functional attributes of these two populations of cells, as well as for the characterization of pyramidal neurons in human disease states.",
keywords = "Dendrite, Dendritic spine, Intracellular filling, Neuronal reconstruction, Pyramidal neuron",
author = "Soloway, {A. S.} and Pucak, {Michele L} and Melchitzky, {D. S.} and Lewis, {D. A.}",
year = "2002",
month = "2",
day = "14",
doi = "10.1016/S0306-4522(01)00507-3",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "109",
pages = "461--471",
journal = "Neuroscience",
issn = "0306-4522",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Dendritic morphology of callosal and ipsilateral projection neurons in monkey prefrontal cortex

AU - Soloway, A. S.

AU - Pucak, Michele L

AU - Melchitzky, D. S.

AU - Lewis, D. A.

PY - 2002/2/14

Y1 - 2002/2/14

N2 - Subpopulations of cortical pyramidal neurons have been distinguished based on the projection target of their principal axons or by their dendritic morphology. In this study, we sought to test the hypothesis that pyramidal neurons in monkey prefrontal cortex that furnish callosal or ipsilateral projections have distinctive dendritic morphologies. Retrogradely-labeled, Fast Blue-containing callosal and ipsilateral neurons were intracellularly filled with Lucifer Yellow, immunoconverted, and reconstructed. Quantitative measurements of the size and complexity of the dendritic arbor, including total dendritic length, horizontal extent, number of branch points, maximum branch order, and number of segments, as well as spine density, were made. In general, callosal neurons had larger and more complex dendritic arbors for both apical and basilar dendritic trees than did ipsilateral neurons. The greatest difference was in total dendritic length; the apical and basilar trees of callosal neurons were 34 and 25% longer, respectively. In addition, spine density was also significantly greater on the apical and basilar dendrites of callosal neurons. These findings could not be explained by differences in somal size or completeness of dendritic filling between callosal and ipsilateral neurons. Our observations support the hypothesis that callosal and ipsilateral neurons differ on a number of measures of dendritic size and complexity. Furthermore, these findings imply that these two subpopulations of pyramidal cells differ in the number and perhaps types of excitatory inputs that they receive. Finally, differences in the dendritic morphology of callosal and ipsilateral neurons have implications for understanding the functional attributes of these two populations of cells, as well as for the characterization of pyramidal neurons in human disease states.

AB - Subpopulations of cortical pyramidal neurons have been distinguished based on the projection target of their principal axons or by their dendritic morphology. In this study, we sought to test the hypothesis that pyramidal neurons in monkey prefrontal cortex that furnish callosal or ipsilateral projections have distinctive dendritic morphologies. Retrogradely-labeled, Fast Blue-containing callosal and ipsilateral neurons were intracellularly filled with Lucifer Yellow, immunoconverted, and reconstructed. Quantitative measurements of the size and complexity of the dendritic arbor, including total dendritic length, horizontal extent, number of branch points, maximum branch order, and number of segments, as well as spine density, were made. In general, callosal neurons had larger and more complex dendritic arbors for both apical and basilar dendritic trees than did ipsilateral neurons. The greatest difference was in total dendritic length; the apical and basilar trees of callosal neurons were 34 and 25% longer, respectively. In addition, spine density was also significantly greater on the apical and basilar dendrites of callosal neurons. These findings could not be explained by differences in somal size or completeness of dendritic filling between callosal and ipsilateral neurons. Our observations support the hypothesis that callosal and ipsilateral neurons differ on a number of measures of dendritic size and complexity. Furthermore, these findings imply that these two subpopulations of pyramidal cells differ in the number and perhaps types of excitatory inputs that they receive. Finally, differences in the dendritic morphology of callosal and ipsilateral neurons have implications for understanding the functional attributes of these two populations of cells, as well as for the characterization of pyramidal neurons in human disease states.

KW - Dendrite

KW - Dendritic spine

KW - Intracellular filling

KW - Neuronal reconstruction

KW - Pyramidal neuron

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0037074892&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0037074892&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/S0306-4522(01)00507-3

DO - 10.1016/S0306-4522(01)00507-3

M3 - Article

VL - 109

SP - 461

EP - 471

JO - Neuroscience

JF - Neuroscience

SN - 0306-4522

IS - 3

ER -