Delusions and patterns of cognitive impairment in alzheimer's disease

Frederick W. Bylsma, Marshal F. Folstein, Devangere P. Devanand, Marcus Richards, Jacqueline Bello, Marilyn Albert, Yaakov Stern

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Cognitive correlates of delusions were examined in 180 probable Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. Deluded (n = 45) and nondeluded (n = 135) AD patients were equally demented, but deluded patients had relatively preserved attention and worse confrontation naming. In an independent sample of AD patients, the finding of better attention in deluded patients was replicated but the naming difference, although in the expected direction, failed to reach significance. Preserved attention and poor naming may be important for the development of delusions in AD patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)98-103
Number of pages6
JournalNeuropsychiatry, Neuropsychology and Behavioral Neurology
Volume7
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1994

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Delusions
Alzheimer Disease
Cognitive Dysfunction

Keywords

  • Alzheimer's disease
  • Cognition
  • Delusion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Neurology
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Delusions and patterns of cognitive impairment in alzheimer's disease. / Bylsma, Frederick W.; Folstein, Marshal F.; Devanand, Devangere P.; Richards, Marcus; Bello, Jacqueline; Albert, Marilyn; Stern, Yaakov.

In: Neuropsychiatry, Neuropsychology and Behavioral Neurology, Vol. 7, No. 2, 1994, p. 98-103.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bylsma, Frederick W. ; Folstein, Marshal F. ; Devanand, Devangere P. ; Richards, Marcus ; Bello, Jacqueline ; Albert, Marilyn ; Stern, Yaakov. / Delusions and patterns of cognitive impairment in alzheimer's disease. In: Neuropsychiatry, Neuropsychology and Behavioral Neurology. 1994 ; Vol. 7, No. 2. pp. 98-103.
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