Deletion of p53 in human mammary epithelial cells causes chromosomal instability and altered therapeutic response

M. B. Weiss, M. I. Vitolo, M. Mohseni, D. M. Rosen, S. R. Denmeade, B. H. Park, D. J. Weber, K. E. Bachman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The TP53 tumor suppressor gene is the most commonly mutated gene in human cancers. To evaluate the biological and clinical relevance of p53 loss, human somatic cell gene targeting was used to delete the TP53 gene in the non-tumorigenic epithelial cell line, MCF-10A. In all four p53/clones generated, cells acquired the capability for epidermal growth factor-independent growth and were defective in appropriate downstream signaling and cell cycle checkpoints in response to DNA damage. Interestingly, p53 loss induced chromosomal instability leading to features of transformation and the selection of clones with varying phenotypes. For example, p53-deficient clones were heterogeneous in their capacity for anchorage-independent growth and invasion. In addition, and of clinical importance, the cohort of p53-null clones showed sensitivity to chemotherapeutic interventions that varied depending not only on the type of chemotherapeutic agent, but also on the treatment schedule. In conclusion, deletion of the TP53 gene from MCF-10A cells eliminated p53 functions, as well as produced p53/clones with varying phenotypes possibly stemming from the distinct chromosomal changes observed. Such a model system will be useful to further understand the cancer-specific phenotypic changes that accompany p53 loss, as well as help to provide future treatment strategies for human malignancies that harbor aberrant p53.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)4715-4724
Number of pages10
JournalOncogene
Volume29
Issue number33
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 19 2010

Keywords

  • Doxorubicin
  • MCF-10A
  • TP53
  • chromosomal instability
  • p53

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics
  • Cancer Research

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  • Cite this

    Weiss, M. B., Vitolo, M. I., Mohseni, M., Rosen, D. M., Denmeade, S. R., Park, B. H., Weber, D. J., & Bachman, K. E. (2010). Deletion of p53 in human mammary epithelial cells causes chromosomal instability and altered therapeutic response. Oncogene, 29(33), 4715-4724. https://doi.org/10.1038/onc.2010.220