Delayed Effects of Radiofrequency Energy on Accessory Atrioventricular Connections

JONATHAN J. LANGBERG, S. MARK BORGANELLI, STEVEN J. KALBFLEISCH, S. ADAM STRIGKBERGER, HUGH GALKINS, FRED MORADY

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence and characteristics of delayed effects on conduction through accessory atrioventricular (AV) connections after apparently successful attempts at radiofrequency catheter ablation. Among 450 patients who had 471 accessory AV connections, the ablation procedure was unsuccessful in 26 patients (6%), as defined by persistent conduction through the accessory AV connection 60 minutes after the final application of radiofrequency energy. In 6/26 unsuccesfully treated patients (24%), conduction through the accessory AV connection disappeared on a delayed basis. At least once during the ablation procedure, conduction through each of these 6 accessory AV connections was transiently eliminated for 10 seconds to 60 minutes. Five of these accessory AV connections were left‐sided and one was posteroseptal; one was concealed and five were manifest. Conduction through the accessory AV connection disappeared on a delayed basis 6–18 hours after the ablation procedure in 4 patients, and at some time between 1–5 days or 1–60 days in the other 2 patients. In 2 patients, the delayed effect was only transient, while in 4 patients, conduction through the accessory AV connections did not return during 5–23 months of follow‐up. In conclusion, up to 15% of patients who undergo an apparently unsuccessful attempt at radiofrequency ablation of an accessory AV connection may later manifest a permanent loss of conduction through the accessory AV connection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1001-1005
Number of pages5
JournalPacing and Clinical Electrophysiology
Volume16
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1993
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Wolff‐Parkinson‐White syndrome
  • radiofrequency catheter ablation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Delayed Effects of Radiofrequency Energy on Accessory Atrioventricular Connections'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this