Delayed cutaneous hypersensitivity reactions to tumor cell antigens and to nonspecific antigens: prognostic significance in patients with lung cancer

S. A. Wells, J. F. Burdick, W. L. Joseph, C. L. Christiansen, W. G. Wolfe, P. C. Adkins

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Oncogenesis is favored by an environment of depressed immunity, but there are few studies in man which correlate both general immunological status and reactivity to tumor associated antigens with the patient's clinical course. Delayed cutaneous hypersensitivity reactions (DCHR) to microbial antigens (mumps, Candida, and streptokinase streptodornase) and to a previously unencountered antigen, 2,4 dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB) were evaluated in 100 ambulatory patients, 75 with lung cancer and 25 with benign lung disease. Eighteen cancer patients were also tested with membrane antigen extract (MAE) of autologous or allogeneic tumor tissue. Twenty four patients with benign lung disease had positive DCHR to both microbial antigens and DNCB. Of the 75 cancer patients, 73 developed DCHR to microbial antigens. Reactivity to DNCB was markedly depressed, with only 39 patients reacting and of 16 patients with nonresectable disease, only 3 reacted. Eight of 18 patients developed DCHR to autologous MAE of lung tumor. Seven of these patients were without recurrence at 8 mth, but only 3 were alive without recurrence at 1 yr. Three of 8 patients with negative DCHR to tumor MAE were alive without recurrent disease at 8 months and also at 1 yr. These data demonstrated that in lung cancer patients a poor prognosis is associated with a depressed immune recognition of DNCB and perhaps a negative cutaneous reactivity to autologous tumor MAE.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)557-562
Number of pages6
JournalUnknown Journal
Volume66
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1973
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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