Delay discounting in current and never-before cigarette smokers: Similarities and differences across commodity, sign, and magnitude

Forest Baker, Matthew W. Johnson, Warren K. Bickel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Research has found that nicotine-dependent individuals delay discount monetary gains at a higher rate than matched controls. Delay discount rates, however, have also been found to vary across within-subject variables such as the magnitude of the outcome (e.g., $10 or $1,000), whether the outcome constitutes a gain or a loss, and the commodity being evaluated (e.g., money or health). The present study comprehensively investigated the differences in delay discounting between current and never-before cigarette smokers and across these within-subject variables. Both groups exhibited a magnitude, sign, and commodity effect. Current smokers' delay discount rates for monetary outcomes, however, were higher than never-before smokers across all magnitudes and both signs. This trend was also found for delayed health outcomes, but failed to reach significance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)382-392
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Abnormal Psychology
Volume112
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2003
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Biological Psychiatry

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