Deficient serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D is associated with an atherogenic lipid profile: The Very Large Database of Lipids (VLDL-3) study

Joshua R. Lupton, Kamil F. Faridi, Seth S. Martin, Sristi Sharma, Krishnaji Kulkarni, Steven R. Jones, Erin D. Michos

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background Cross-sectional studies have found an association between deficiencies in serum vitamin D, as measured by 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D), and an atherogenic lipid profile. These studies have focused on a limited panel of lipid values including low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and triglycerides (TG). Objective Our study examines the relationship between serum 25(OH)D and an extended lipid panel (Vertical Auto Profile) while controlling for age, gender, glycemic status, and kidney function. Methods We used the Very Large Database of Lipids, which includes US adults clinically referred for analysis of their lipid profile from 2009 to 2011. Our study focused on 20,360 subjects who had data for lipids, 25(OH)D, age, gender, hemoglobin A1c, insulin, creatinine, and blood urea nitrogen. Subjects were split into groups based on serum 25(OH)D: deficient (<20 ng/mL), intermediate (≥20-30 ng/mL), and optimal (≥30 ng/mL). The deficient group was compared to the optimal group using multivariable linear regression. Results In multivariable-adjusted linear regression, deficient serum 25(OH)D was associated with significantly lower serum HDL-C (-5.1%) and higher total cholesterol (+9.4%), non-HDL-C (+15.4%), directly measured LDL-C (+13.5%), intermediate-density lipoprotein cholesterol (+23.7%), very low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (+19.0%), remnant lipoprotein cholesterol (+18.4%), and TG (+26.4%) when compared with the optimal group. Conclusion Deficient serum 25(OH)D is associated with significantly lower HDL-C and higher directly measured LDL-C, intermediate-density lipoprotein cholesterol, very low-density lipoproteins cholesterol, remnant lipoprotein cholesterol, and TG. Future trials examining vitamin D supplementation and cardiovascular disease risk should consider using changes in an extended lipid panel as an additional outcome measurement.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)72-81.e1
JournalJournal of clinical lipidology
Volume10
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2016

Keywords

  • 25(OH)D
  • Glycemic status
  • Kidney function
  • Lipid
  • Lipoprotein
  • Vitamin D

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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